A Trio Of Visits To Lugnaquilla

Spring was late this year. It is almost as if it didn’t happen.
We had snowstorms in Dublin up until 18th March – this is very unusual for Ireland.
Not that I was complaining, I love the white stuff!

We did not have many bright days though (until recently), there have only been two days (on the weekends, so not including weekdays) where I had been out walking and the sun was out for more than an hour. Two… in four months!
And this day, the first visit to Lug this year for me, on the 21st April – was one of them. And it was one of the most beautiful days I have ever had at my favourite place in Wicklow.

Usual drill, 03:00 hours start, camera packed, batteries charged, lunch prepared, starbar packed (important, this part) and of course thermals on. I suspected it was to be cold early in the morning, and I was right. Very cold in fact, because there was no cloud cover for insulation.

I have neglected my blog a bit recently, not deliberately – I’ve just found it tricky to find the time. It does take several hours to go through my photographs of a day out and then several hours to put it all together in a post. I’ve had a few issues this last few months – car trouble, camera trouble, among various other things that do not need to be shared here. A very busy year so far. Well, here is a long post to make up for that!

Anyway, back to the first walk….
Usual starting point for me, Fenton’s Pub down in the Glen Of Imaal – I choose this route for a couple of reasons but most importantly because my car has always been safe at the journey start. Car break ins in Wicklow are a real problem, and on the rise I am afraid. With the ever increasing popularity of hill walking, I fear it will only increase further. I have been the victim of break ins a few times and I do not wish for it to happen to me again.

This would be my first ascent of Lugnaquilla this year, though I have spent a lot of time in the South Prison and surrounding area – I had not visited the summit so far this year.

A predawn shot, showing the ‘Belt Of Venus’ glow over the Glen Of Imaal from Camara Hill. A nice warm glow on a cold morning.
Keadeen Belt Of Venus copy.jpg

I had not realised it at the time, but I did not take any photographs since the above one until I paused for breath part way up the final slope to Lugnaquilla itself. I was on a mission!
Looking back over the shoulder of Ballineddan and the Glen Of Imaal. Nice, warm light – but I was cold! The sun rises beyond Lugnaquilla from the direction in which I approached it, so it would be a while before the sunlight struck the slope I was on.
Ballineddan copy.jpg

Looking south now, over the shoulder of Slievemaan. Some very vibrant colours on display. Brilliant atmospheric clarity too, at this time. Early mornings often are the best for this sort of atmospheric visibility, also known as ‘seeing’ or ‘astronomical seeing’. When you shoot a high resolution camera with Zeiss lenses – the limiting factors in your photographs are the photographer, and the weather. Only one of these elements I can control!
Slievemaan copy.jpg

The final stages of the approach, and here is my old friend – the ‘dice’ of Lugnaquilla. I rolled a 6 weather wise this day!
Dice copy.jpg

It is often desirable to get everything sharp when shooting landscape photographs. But not always.
I think blur can be very beautiful and subject isolation is a strength of fast lenses. I took several versions of the above, some at wide apertures, others stopped down. I preferred the wide open shot at f/1.4 above ultimately.

The summit cairn at just after 08:00 in the morning. I was the first up here on this day, I believe. It’d be a lot busier here later in the day! And yes, that horizon is straight – I use a digital spirit level and my tripod analogue spirit level to level all of my photographs – I do not level my camera ‘by eye’ because that is not an accurate method when shooting in the mountains. Using a more accurate digital spirit level shows the lay of the land much more truthfully.
Blue skies!
Summit copy.jpg

Moving over to the South Prison area now, the heat of the sun has started to affect me now. I was cursing my thermals!South Prison copy.jpg

A similar shot, this time using my Zeiss Milvus 35mm f/1.4 lens. I had to climb down a bit, on some steep ground, to get the composition I wanted here.
South Prison 35 copy.jpg

A few words about the Zeiss 35mm lens. It’s a lens I have not owned for long and I am still in the process of making my mind up about it. It has some distinct advantages over any other 35mm lens I have used before but it also has some caveats. Like anything I suppose! It’s heavy (over 1kg) and expensive (about £1700). It is also manual focus only – not an issue for me as I manual focus every single landscape photograph I take but some might not like that.
However, it has almost zero chromatic aberration which is a major, I repeat MAJOR advantage over any other 35mm lens I have ever used. The Sigma 35mm f/1.4 has very large amounts of lateral chromatic aberration in the edges. This is contrary to the reviews of many ‘experts’ online who only shoot test charts when reviewing new lenses.
I do encourage those who are looking for absolute image quality to research thoroughly before buying new lenses and try to seek out (multiple) honest opinions rather than just reading a lens review based purely on shooting test charts.
I prefer to shoot lenses in the real world and discover their characteristics in a method that is applicable to my own style of shooting. I don’t spend my free time photographing flat charts on walls, so why would I test a new lens that way? I am fairly certain that I am not in the minority here…
Photographing test charts in a studio can only reveal so much about a lens and while it can be worthwhile in some cases, I think it sort of misses the point a bit.
Also, quite often these ‘expert reviews’ do not state on which camera body (and thus how many megapixels) they are testing the lens with. A good performance from a lens on a 20 megapixel camera might be a totally different story when shot on a 36 megapixel (or higher) camera.
A high contrast scene such as the above would totally reveal the chromatic aberration limitations of the Sigma 35mm. This can be removed in Photoshop of course, but at the loss of sharpness, acuity and contrast – and that loss can be significant. The Zeiss has no CA that is perceptible to my very critical eye.
Don’t get me wrong, the Sigma is a good lens – but there is a vast league between the performance of it and the Zeiss Milvus in the edges of the frame. Why shoot a high resolution camera if only the middle pixels are worth keeping?
Well, as always – my honest opinions are my own and based purely on my own findings.
And of course, I am just an amateur photographer in my spare time so I am not sponsored or endorsed by any companies – thus, you can trust my opinion! I own both lenses.
I come from a software engineering background – so I am a very technical photographer and maximising image quality is important to me.

Back to the walk!
There were a few areas I wanted to visit this day on the mountain, and I ended up walking 21.49 kms according to my step counter.
the views of the South Prison are covered in the two images above, but my main area of focus for this walk was an area above a location marked as the ‘Green Corner’ on my map. Reading the contours on the map suggested that this was an area of very steep ground, on the north east face of Lugnaquilla. I suspected the views from here over to Fraughan Rock Glen and Benleagh would be quite dramatic.
Looking North East copy.jpg

And again, trust me – the horizon is straight. At left of the image, in the distance – are the higher mountains in Wicklow, and the hills gradually wane in height as we look more eastwards (to the right in the photo) towards the sea.
A large number of the hills of Wicklow are on display here! The rocky area directly beneath my feet (foreground) is an area of steep, shelving ground. A great place to explore I imagine. Just beyond that is an area known as Lugueer. I don’t actually know how this translates to English but I suggest the ‘Lug’ prefix means ‘hollow’. Perhaps someone can let me know in the comments section!
The steep rock face at left is that of Benleagh, with Bendoo opposite, casting strong shadows. I will leave it to readers of this post to identify other areas/hills here! To regular walkers, it should be easy enough!

One of the reasons I get up so early for my visits to the mountain is that in spring/summer there are often warm, bright days with lovely sunshine but shooting around midday is really not the best for landscape photographs. Early morning and late evening is better.
When the sun is directly overhead, the light is harsh and the angle of shadows can be problematic. When you add heat shimmer/atmospheric lensing into the mix – shooting satisfactory images can be difficult. I took this one at 09:46. Already there was some atmospheric lensing at play here but it’s barely perceptible in the photograph. This is caused by temperature differential. I must get here earlier next time!

Another, detail shot of the cliffs of Benleagh. I used my 85mm f/1.8g Nikon for this shot. A lovely lens, and light! Lens weight is a big deal when you hike 20+ kilometres!
Benleagh 85 copy.jpg

I don’t tend to process my photographs much really but sometimes a tool is required for a certain situation.
So I added a small amount of saturation to this photograph, and used a small of amount of a ‘de-haze’ method I employ. The sunshine was a little hazy but I wanted to get as much detail as I could.

A wide angle lens of the same scene now, taken with my 20mm f/1.8g Nikon. Lovely blue skies. Amazing view here, much of the Wicklow uplands on display, including Tonelagee and Mullaghcleevaun.
That white patch at the right is a small patch of snow. It was due to be 20°C + in Dublin this day, so I don’t suspect it will last long (though it would be about 14°C here).
Looking North East 20 copy.jpg

A fine lens indeed, and light! I appreciate Nikon’s strategy of light, plastic lenses.
Heavy metal lenses might seem more durable, but drop a plastic lens – it bounces. Drop a metal one, something has to give. And as mentioned before, weight is a consideration when hiking.
F/11 – f/13 sees to be the optimal apertures for the 20mm lens, when there are close foreground subjects and detail in the distance. Choice of focus area is far more important though, and this is a point often overlooked by many photographers I speak to. Focus stacking is an option of course, but in Ireland the wind would be an enemy here and to be honest – I am not the gentlest touch when it comes to moving focus rings! For focus stacking, you need zero movement in the camera.

My new favourite trio of lenses for walks is the 20mm f/1.8g Nikon, 35mm f/1.4 Zeiss Milvus and the unrivalled (my favourite lens) 100mm f/2 Zeiss Milvus. But, the Zeiss lenses are not light.

After a snack (a banana), I opted to head out to the next location before midday struck. This location was about 500 meters to the west of my position here, at the rim of the North Prison.
North Prison copy.jpg

A portrait of the cliffs of the North Prison, with Keadeen looming beyond.
North Prison 85 copy.jpg

An unobstructed view now, looking down from the heights of the North Prison to Lugatroch and onward to Glen Imaal. Still some large snow patches here. North Prison 35 copy.jpg

The mountain is truly more than a summit indeed.
A lot of work done this day, From here I then climbed back to the summit and decided to have lunch at the rim of the South Prison.

A view that I have shared here on my blog before, but a favourite of mine – looking over to Lugcoolmeen from the South Prison of Lugnaquilla.
Lugcoolmeen copy.jpg

A wider shot of Lugcoolmeen, with the foreground falling away below. I do like to shoot a scene with different focal lengths (and thus different fields of view), I find that it’s nice to have options later and also it can provide a lot of context about a place.
Lugcoolmeen 20 copy.jpg

And now, a narrower field of view using a portrait lens. You might be able to make out the small figures of people near the middle of the image! I wish I could upload higher resolution images but WordPress does not allow this unless you pay.
Lugcoolmeen 85 copy.jpg

Crikey, this is going to be a long post. Sixteen photographs in and I am still talking about the first of three walks!

Still above the South Prison here, this is one of my favourite lunch spots. Looking down to Aughavannagh now – a hazy view but pleasant nonetheless. Croghan Kinsella sits at the rear at distance with what appears to be the smoke from a (presumably) gorse fire at right of the image. Also visible here, at bottom right – is the forest track I took when I took A Stroll To The South Prison Of Lugnaquilla.
Aughavannagh copy.jpg

Time to start heading back to the car now, I had done a lot of work already this day and there was more yet to do!
I headed back to the summit then took a track above the North Prison heading south west to start the descent of Lugnaquilla.
I tend to prefer to descend slightly nearer the cliffs than most people do. It’s not easier, but the view is superb down to the Glen Of Imaal. It is quieter!
I’d like to mention here, all of the areas I have visited at Lugnaquilla I have done so ONLY after talking to the warden in the Glen Imaal Army Headquarters (near Fenton’s Pub). I have had many conversations with various Army Sergeants in here, so I am well aware of where I can and can’t go.
Please do not stray off of the approved routes when walking at or near Lugnaquilla/the artillery range.
From North Prison copy.jpg

Looking over to Keadeen and Ballineddan.
Keadeen copy.jpg

Back at Lower Corrig now, and a quick glimpse back at Lugnaquilla.
Lug copy.jpg

A wider view, showing more of the route and the great hollow that is the North Prison.
Lug 20 copy.jpg

The last stretch now, after the descent of Camara Hill. This is always torture. At this point in the walk – I am always exhausted and this rocky/potholed army road is killer!
Last Stretch copy.jpg

Until next time, Lug…
Little did I know, that in the next few weeks I would get two more visits to this place!

The 6th of May was my second visit this year, and the day before my 34th birthday. I am getting way too old for this.
Another early start indeed! And another glorious day. Very hot though. Tough work this day.
05:12 am, and this was my view partway up the army road, at Camara Crossroad. A calm, humid and foggy morning, no wind at all.
Moon copy.jpg

A foggy morning indeed, at least here, in the valley.
Fog copy.jpg

Gaining height now, as the sun also begins to rise. As I ascend Camara Hill, it becomes apparent that the fog is hanging in the valleys/lowlands and that the hills are clear. I had suspected this might be the case because I have seen similar conditions before. Cool!
Fog Keadeen copy.jpg

The Belt Of Venus above a fog enshrouded Glen Of Imaal and Ballyhook hill emerging above the fog.
Belt of Venus copy.jpg

A similar shot, with the shoulder of Spinan’s Hill at left. What a morning!
Belt of Venus II copy.jpg

For this walk, I thought it might be a good idea to take the triple threat lenses of my Nikon 20mm, Zeiss 35mm and Zeiss 100mm. These are my favourite lenses and the above five photographs were taken with the 100mm. A flexible lens indeed, and my all time favourite.

A familiar tree to myself. This is where the real work begins – on open hillside now and the 20 minutes of purgatory that is the ascent of Camara Hill awaits.
Tree copy.jpg

Well, it took a LOT longer than twenty minutes to get up here on this morning. I was constantly pausing for photographs. It should be understood, that as a precise landscape photographer – the phrase ‘pausing for photographs’ for me means removing my heavy back pack, unstrapping my heavy tripod, setting up the tripod and possibly even taking out my metal lens case to switch a lens and then carefully composing my shot, dialling in my settings and taking an image. It is not a simple process of ‘point and shoot’. If life was that simple!
The Sugarloaf Of Imaal rising above the sea of fog. At right just beyond the tree is the command and control tower for the artillery range peaking above the fog.
Sugarloaf Of Imaal copy.jpg

At the summit of Camara Hill now, a quick shot down to Mount Leinster was worthwhile I thought.
Mount Leinster copy.jpg

And here it is, basking in the morning light – the target for the day. Lugnaquilla.
Lug copy.jpg

The fog did not last long, the May sun too potent. It started to break up at 07:45. A view back to the summit of Camara hill.
Camara copy.jpg

Ascending Lugnaquilla now, and the view south shows some fog still in the lowlands, and the Moon in the sky (near top right).
This photograph is interesting because it shows the nature of the final slope up to Lugnaquilla – a rock strewn affair. South copy.jpg

I did not pause much for photographs until I reached the point of interest – I had wanted to return to the location above the ‘Green Corner’. I was happy with the image I previously took here but I wanted to see it in earlier morning light. The atmosphere was much clearer. I was right to press on.Benleagh copy.jpg

My plan for this day was much the same as my previous visit two weeks prior. From here, I headed to the North Prison and then on to the South Prison.

The North Prison, on another beautiful day!
North Prison copy.jpg

The same, with my 35mm Zeiss. I particularly like the patterns of the water flows.
North Prison 35 copy.jpg

At the South Prison now, and my usual lunch spot facilitates. Miraculously, there is still a small patch of snow! Very hot at this moment in time.
Lugcoolmeen copy.jpg

A similar shot with the Zeiss 35mm.
Lugcoolmeen 35 copy.jpg

The tumbling cliffs of the South Prison.
Cliff copy.jpg

Walkers at Lugcoolmeen, with the peaks of East Wicklow beyond.
Walkers copy.jpg

Whew. What a day. Super hot too. It was around this time (about 11:00) that I was wondering why I had left my sun cream in the car. I know why. It’s because I am an idiot.
Luckily for me, I don’t burn too much – being of slightly dark complexion – but leaving the sun cream in the car was not cool.
Heading back now, usual descent route besides the North Prison and I paused for this almost aerial shot of Lugatroch.
Lugatroch copy.jpg

Inside the North Prison. I did a bit of scrambling to get this shot.
I always forget ‘arm day’!
Whew, getting really hot now in the midday sun. No shelter at all from it’s intense rays.
Inside North Prison copy.jpg

I enjoy rock formations, and rocks/boulders in general actually. I am not sure why. But I think it’s a metaphorical reason. I dislike change, certainly changes that are impactful that appear suddenly. I suppose that to me, rocks symbolize at least the implication of permanence – of course, nothing is permanent, including rocks. But within a persons short lifetime, rocks do not visibly change.
Rocks II copy.jpg

More granite.
Rocks copy.jpg

A bit more granite.
Rocks III copy.jpg

Some more granite to chew on.
Granite copy.jpg

Almost off the steep slopes of Lugnaquilla now, and a shot towards the Glen Of Imaal.
Glen Imaal copy.jpg

What? How is it now 15:00? I was having so much fun scrambling around the North Prison that I completely lost track of it!

Back at Camara Hill now, I always take one last glance back at Lugnaquilla.
Lug-2 copy.jpg

22.40 kms later! Time to stop off in the Glen Imaal store and buy myself a pre birthday treat of a giant cornetto! I believed that I had earned it!

P.S. I like trees too.
Tree-3 copy.jpg

May 19th was the date of my third visit.
A very early start. 01:30, to be precise. Yep, I am mad.
A beautiful clear night, and light winds. This would change as the day progressed – gales were forecast past noon. I always forget (living in the city) how clear the milky way can be seen out in the countryside away from light pollution. Even in this shot, light pollution is evident.
The planet Jupiter and (I can make out four) some of it’s moons above Keadeen mountain.
Jupiter copy.jpg

05:00 , twenty minutes before sunrise just below the final push up to Lugnaquilla. Yep, a nice rock formation!
Rock copy.jpg

First light over Keadeen.
Streaky clouds in the sky like this can be indicative of high winds in the upper atmosphere.
Keadeen copy.jpg

The first rays of sunlight strike the North Prison cliffs not long after sunrise.
Sunrise copy.jpg

Already starting to get windy now, glad I brought my windproof jacket (not optional in Wicklow!). The forecast for the day was warm, with clear skies in the morning but increasing cloud and wind by noon. I had intended to be off the mountain by that time anyway – due to my 01:30 am start!
Climbing up beside the North Prison, I had no real targets in mind this day. I just wanted to visit Lugnaquilla. I reached the summit just after 06:00, 41 minutes after sunrise. Somewhat surprisingly, I was the only one here! <joke>.

I decided to potter about near Lugcoolmeen, to over look the great cliffs of the South Prison.
South Prison copy.jpg

It was here, that I decided it might be a good idea to check out the great gully, labelled ‘The Big Troch’ on my map. Some scrambling awaited!

Winds picking up already, and it’s only 08:00. The beginnings of what appear to be lenticular clouds forming above Lugcoolmeen.
Lugcoolmeen copy.jpg

The direction finder on the summit of Lugnaquilla.
Direction Finder copy.jpg

To find the gully from here, the summit – is not that hard actually, though most visitors to the mountain never see it. Head south, gently descending until you meet a large granite outcrop. From here, strike out south east and the ground starts to descend steeply. The gully will be clear in front of you. This is a dangerous area, the ground is exceedingly steep and falls away abruptly. Care required and bring a map, always.Gully copy.jpg

A wider view of the gully, showing some nice context.
Gully 20 copy.jpg

I wanted to do some detail shots of the gully, using my Zeiss 100mm, but this meant doing a small bit of scrambling so I took this shot as a precautionary warning.
It’s called “Don’t Slip!”.
Don't slip copy.jpg

Lovely rocks.
Gully 100 copy.jpg

I loved this formation.
Gully 35 copy.jpg

Getting very hazy now, and super windy. It felt strange, contemplating the walk back to the car at only 10:00. but it must be remembered, I started the walk before 03:00 am!

Heading back to my descent route beside the North Prison now, yep – this means climbing back up Lug to head down the other side. Easier than the alternative, which would be to contour around the southern slope itself. This is covered with small mica-schist rocks and progress can be slow and awkward (I found this out the hard way, of course).
Very hazy now, long range photographs are not going to work at all now – as the below shot of Glen Imaal demonstrates.
Sugar Loaf copy.jpg

A final glance over to Lugnaquilla (as usual) from the top of Camara Hill, taken at 12:20 noon. It did feel strange to be leaving so early but at this stage I had spent 9 hours out here and still had an hour or so to go!
Lugnaquilla copy.jpg

This shot is interesting because it shows a large part of the journey between Camara Hill (behind me, not in photo) and Lower Corrig, Upper Corrig and Lugnaquilla itself – along with the rough track that expires at the top of Lugnaquilla (when you are likely to need it most in fog!).

Another hot day, another 22.32 kms!

So, see you in two weeks, Lugnaquilla?

Thank you for reading!

If you like what you see here please feel free to take a look at my portfolio site where you can see lots more of my work, or follow me on Twitter or Facebook here!

The images presented here are my intellectual property and must not be distributed without my consent.

The Zig Zags of Glenmalure and Jim’s High Rock

Glenmalure is the longest glacial valley in Ireland and Britain.
A valley filled with rich history both of the human kind and the natural. A truly fascinating area, and one that I really should spend more time in. But there are so many amazing places in Wicklow, and I am just one person who does this in his spare time!
Weather wise, the forecast had stated ‘a few bright spells, but mostly cloudy with locally heavy showers’. So, a typical day in Ireland really!

When the red flag is flying, the military are firing!Red Flag copy.jpg

This flag means firing is ongoing in the Glen of Imaal artillery range, so access to the mountains immediately in that area is prohibited. I would be going nowhere near this area today, but the place I intended to visit is a popular approach to Lugnaquilla, Lug itself being partly in the range – hence the warning here. My plan was to head up the Zig Zags and swan on over to Jim’s High Rock.

Immediately upon leaving the car, a wonderful sight comes in view – a quaint little cottage tucked away below Carrawaystick Waterfall.Carrawaystick Waterfall copy.jpg

To get to the Zig Zags you need to walk beside the cottage itself, beside Carrawaystick Brook – but that proved to be no hardship!Lovely Cottage copy.jpg

Shortly after this, I needed to cross Carrawaystick Brook itself.

How convenient! A handy bridge has been constructed by volunteer organisation Mountain Meitheal (who aim to conserve mountain areas in Ireland).Carrawaystick Bridge copy.jpg

I wanted to walk up the Zig Zag track on the steep north-eastern slopes of Cloghernagh Mountain, itself a high eastern spur of Lugnaquilla. This track is old, and owned privately by a local sheep farmer who kindly grants access to walkers on this track. Historically, the track was used by the Parnell family as a hunting track in the 1800s, and according to this sign – no dogs are allowed. Which is fair enough really, given that the landowner has sheep on the hillside.Zig Zags signpost copy.jpg

As you travel up the Zig Zags on the steep slopes of Cloghernagh, and gain height, a wonderful view opens up of the fertile valley floor of Glenmalure below.Valley Floor copy.jpg

A tricky scene to capture actually. Even the impressive dynamic range of my Nikon D810 was not able to cope with the dark shaded valley floor and the bright sun light shafts and sky. Exposing to keep the highlights of the bright sky would yield a very dark valley, and exposing for the dark valley would result in a ‘blown out’ overexposed sky. There are some options for scenes like this. You can bracket your shots (take multiple images at different exposure levels to compensate for the high contrast) and later merge them in software on the computer (known as HDR merging) OR you can use a graduated neutral density filter. These days I typically prefer to use the filter as it means I can get it almost correct with one shot, in camera. In my experience it also yields a ‘more natural’ result, and I do generally (there are exceptions, of course) like to keep my photographs representative rather than overly ‘creative’ in terms of post processing. To me, photography is artistic in the idea of the photograph itself (the subject), the composition and the vital ingredient – the light, not the ‘post processing’. It is not by accident that I ‘stumble’ onto amazing places in Wicklow, it is through careful examination of maps, scouting trips and preplanning. Anyway, I like to limit my time on the PC, as I work as a computer programmer full time so 40 odd hours a week at a desk in front of a PC is more than enough for me thanks!

Moving on, it is time to start climbing again. The views really start to open up as more height is gained on the Zig Zags. Here are some nice (almost) autumnal trees.Trees copy.jpg

Autumn is perhaps a little late here in Wicklow, we have not really had a proper frost yet so the autumn colours are not at their peak just yet. A couple more weeks I think. But the colours are still quite remarkable regardless.Colours copy.jpg

I am not sure that this is the absolute best place to stand for grazing?Sheep copy.jpg

The final leg of the Zig Zags now, looking over to the steep slopes Lugduff Mountain. A small patch of sunlight too! Nice!Last leg copy.jpg

From here, we break out onto open hillside. This is where the fun begins! A friendly reminder that we are now heading for mountains, and to be prepared.Warning copy.jpg

A key point to note here on the sign is ‘appropriate clothing’. I endured no less than three thunderous downpours of rain this day. It was also very cold with a biting northerly wind. Definitely thermal jumper, two fleeces and winter waterproof jacket weather!

Yup, here comes the rain.Rain coming copy.jpg

I had to hunker down a bit here, the rain was very heavy. I needed to waterproof my rucksack with my camera gear tucked safely inside. I do not use the ‘rain shield’ that comes bundled with outdoors rucksacks, as I find them to be next to useless in proper rain. A little hiking tip here – I use large bin bags! I secure my pack inside this, and once the rain stops I shake the rain off the bin bag, dry it off as much as possible and then fold it back into my pack inside another (completely dry) bin bag (to prevent my pack getting wet from the inside) so that it is mostly dry in the event I need it later – it would defeat the point if I then put a completely wet bin bag inside my pack! This strategy works well for me, and it’s something I have been doing for years. Your Mileage May Vary of course. I sat and ate my spicy pasta (yum) and grapes (yum!) and waited for the shower to pass. It’s funny, food always tastes better when you are hiking!

I always love shooting after the rain, the light on the landscape changes dramatically.After the rain copy.jpg

Getting higher still now, and the rain seems to have passed, for the moment at least. Looking down to Glenmalure beyond Carrawaystick Brook gives hint that this is indeed not the last shower for today!Looking down to Glenmalure copy.jpg

I do love trees, and all of nature really.
Backlit Forest copy.jpg

I am approaching my destination now, Jim’s High Rock.
I do not know who Jim is (or rather, was) unfortunately, and I could not find any information about him in my research – but he has a splendid view over to the cliffs of Benleagh Mountain from his rock!Vicinity of Jim's High Rock copy.jpg
Here is a small section of Jim’s High rock, not a great place to be ‘hanging around’ (sorry), given that there are sharp and high cliffs beyond that crag.Jim's High Rock copy.jpg

I am afraid I am going to have to cheat a little bit here, and use an image I took on a previous trip to this place to show you Jim’s High Rock itself. I wouldn’t normally do this but I had to head for home (due to time constraints) shortly after the above photograph so I did not manage to get to the best spot for the shot. I do like to document an area based on a particular visit but I really wanted to share this image. Anyway, here is one I made earlier (on a much nicer day too!).Jim's High Rock cheat copy.jpg

In clear weather, as you can see, the view is very impressive in the vicinity of this ancient granite crag.
Time to return to the car now. Back the way I came. The rain had started again, and with it those biting northerlies. I took one last look back at the upper slopes of Cloghernagh, where I was earlier- quite steep in parts, with wet rock and soggy peat – far too easy to slip on. The fog was getting lower too.Looking back to Cloghernagh copy.jpg

Back on the Zig Zags again, much harder coming down that going up in my opinion. I have always found descent much trickier than ascent. My knees are getting too old for it!

The bracken here is most colourful! The Avonbeg River on the valley floor of Glenmalure is also visible at distance in this photograph.Bracken copy.jpg

A close up photograph of the dying bracken. Yep, autumn is coming!Bracken decaying copy.jpg

And finally, I return to the Carrawaystick bridge I crossed earlier.Carrawaystick Bridge II copy.jpg

A good days hike!

If you like what you see here please feel free to take a look at my portfolio site where you can see lots more of my work, or follow me on Facebook here!