A Stroll To The South Prison Of Lugnaquilla

I have been walking in Wicklow for years, and I know many routes. Some secret, some not so secret. They are all fun though!
The walk I chose this day, I chose for a few reasons – the first reason being that I had not done this walk for years (the last time was 15th March, 2015) and the second reason was that I wanted shelter from the strong (65 km/h +) and cold north-westerly winds that were forecast for this day.
I also wanted to test out a 20mm lens that is ‘new-ish’ to me. I have had the Sigma 20mm f/1.4 for about a year now, and whilst I have been very impressed by the sharpness in the middle 75% or so of the image frame – I have never found the peripheries/edges of the image satisfactory on a 36 megapixel camera – for landscape photographs at least. And, yes – I tried multiple samples (three) and they all exhibited the same behaviour – troublesome forward arcing field curvature at the edges being the main culprit, and sharpness robbing lateral chromatic aberration. This makes planar subjects (and landscapes in general) quite troublesome to shoot when in the field.
The Nikon 20mm f/1.8g that I am currently using does not have this issue. The edges sharpen up nicely (and predictably) as you stop it down and it weighs about a third of the Sigma. When you are hiking 25+ kilometres this is a BIG deal. Yeah, I lost 2/3rd’s of a stop of light – but I rarely shoot landscapes at f/1.4 (but not never)!  It is, like the Sigma, also very sharp – perhaps a little less sharp in the centre of the image but more consistently sharp across the frame – this consistency is far more important to the type of photography that I do.

Weather forecast for the day was sunny skies and no fog on Lugnaquilla (this turned out to be false!). Strong north-westerly winds though. Trying to achieve sharp photographs at ISO 64 (the base ISO on the D810) on a high resolution camera with strong winds can sometimes be simply an exercise in frustration. And for me, walking and photography is a relaxing, leisurely pursuit.

Onto the walk!
The walk itself, at first glance, might seem quite unappealing and uninteresting. Starting from Aughavannagh, you walk for around 6 kilometres on forestry track until you hit a stile that you cross over onto open hillside. Just beyond here lies the provocatively named “Madwoman’s Brook”.

Parking my car at sunrise, I liked the colours of the trees as the sunlight broke through the mostly cloudy skies.
Trees copy.jpg

Moving on now, a bit of a climb to do today. Though most of it is on easy going forestry tracks, there is still ground to cover!
As I previously mentioned, I have not visited this walk for a couple of years and as much as I’d like to believe otherwise, things do change. The forestry workers (Coillte) have certainly been busy – large swathes of the plantations have been felled, and in their wake only rotting stumps and wasteland is left – and in some cases, new saplings. It does open up the views a bit though, where previously the trees were towering over you.
Windy enough here! I’d say that’s because the trees have gone :).
Felled copy.jpg

There was a lot of snowfall in the week prior to my walk here, but a lot of the snow has already melted in the hills unfortunately. It’s often the case that the lower hills get a few days (sometimes a week) of snowfall in winter but the snow also has a tendency to melt before your eyes. The higher mountains usually hold snow for most of the winter though (i.e. Lugnaquilla).

I do like to try and capture places that others might not usually see. This does take me to some of the less frequented parts of Wicklow, which I enjoy, and sometimes I find a gem!
I think this walk is one of those gems, and it’s very rewarding for a relatively straight forward walk.

Now that the trees in this area have been felled, a new view has opened up. Looking beyond the slopes of Carrickashane and Ballygobban hills towards Croghan Kinsella not long after sunrise. I like taking these type of shots in winter, when the sun is low in the sky and only the shapes of the hills themselves are visible – sort of a silhouette effect.Carrickashane Ballygobban copy.jpg

Walking on now, not much to see for a while – the trees tower over on each side where they are not felled.
White Stone Brook is in swell, from the snow melt water from the higher slopes of Corrigasleggaun.White Stone Brook copy.jpg

Climbing higher on the forestry tracks now, and there is still some snow here in the sheltered spots. Not much though. Some patches remain on the north eastern slopes of Aughavannagh Mountain in the distance as well.
Forest Track Snow copy.jpg

The view opens up a bit again, as I get nearer the south prison. Another silhouette style shot.Silhouette cop1y.jpg

An interesting re-entrant on the slopes of Aughavannagh Mountain.
Re-entrant copy.jpg

Finally, at the end of the forest track there are a couple of choices – one being to cross “Madwoman’s Brook” to follow a wet path up and into the south prison, (which was not preferable this day – due to it being in spate from snow melt) or the option I chose: handrail the brook on the eastern shore of the river, through a recently felled forest area (recently as in: probably five years ago!). The going is a bit tough here, there are dead branches, tree stumps and ankle breaking holes in the ground to negotiate. Also, on this day – some wet slushy snow! It’s also very slippery, Ireland is a wet country indeed. Yeah, progress was quite slow getting up this way and care is certainly required. Even slower going back down later!
Good to see that the sitka spruce saplings are coming along nicely. Aw, they grow up so fast!
Saplings copy.jpg

It’s always curious that the forestry workers leave a few of the taller trees standing after felling an area. I have often wondered if this was so that the teller ones could protect the younger, less sturdy trees from future storms whilst they grow. Or, perhaps more likely – it’s so that the older trees can warn the younger ones of the peril of their ancestors. Leave some alive to spread the fear!

A hazy view of the ‘survivors’. I like this sort of hazy winter light, it adds a lot of atmosphere to a location. As usual in my photographs, little to no post processing has been performed on the images in this blog post.
Survivors copy.jpg

Lunch time!
Ham sub and some clementines. Yum. I really love the clementines you can buy around the Christmas period. Lucky me!

Completing the slope of death (tree death, that is) and out onto open hillside now. The going should have been a bit easier now.
Alas! It was not!
Tussocks of heather, and bog holes hidden by snow (some drifting too) made progress very awkward. And I had fooled myself into thinking I had chosen an easy walk this day!

The first view of the great cliffs of the south prison emerges as the fog clears a bit. It still remained at the top of Lugnaquilla though, where it sat all day.

I used an 85mm lens for this shot, so there is a slight compression effect. The higher cliffs are strewn with icicles. Given that I was using a short telephoto lens here, getting a perfectly sharp shot was quite tricky – the wind was tempestuous! South Prison-3 copy.jpg

A wide angle (20mm) shot of the prison.
South Prison copy.jpg

This looks great on my wide screen monitor at home. I wish WordPress would allow higher resolution images on the blogs so that you could enjoy the detail in this image.

After coming all this way, I did not actually stick around here for long. The wind was very strong, and it was very cold. I took a few more shots of the area and then I decided to head back to the car. Quite a walk back at this stage. My footsteps in the drifts, snow depth was almost to knee height in parts here.Footsteps copy.jpg

Back past the ‘slope of tree death’ now, and I took a small detour to take a photograph of the decrepit stile you cross (or more safely, ignore and walk straight beside -this wood is very rotten) that takes you on to “Madwoman’s Brook”. I always like to take this shot when I am here, and it’s definitely in a more sorry state than when I was here over two years ago.
Decrepit Stile copy.jpg

Walking back on the forest tracks now, and for a moment I look behind me as I pause for water.
This view was not here on my approach earlier!
The fog was much lower earlier, concealing the entirety of the mountain itself.
Lugnaquilla Forest Track copy.jpg

A closer view with a longer lens. Having a long lens is very handy for achieving different compositions.
Lugnaquilla copy.jpg

Getting near sunset now, and progress on the forest track is slow. Not that I was worried, I have a head torch for such occasions!
Silhouette Sunset copy.jpg

I paused here for a few minutes, experimenting with different apertures. This shot at f/1.8 has a nice soft look to it, possessing an almost ethereal quality. A common mistake (one I also make) in landscape photography is the mentality that ‘everything has to be in focus’ – I think this is wrong, blur can be beautiful. Only about a third of the nearest foot in this photograph is in focus.
Soft copy.jpg

A nice warm tone to the sky at this time, as the sun was setting. Ironic really – it was COLD!Warm copy.jpg

Back at the car and time to drive home now. A long drive on the N81, as I was not wanting to risk the mountain roads. A hard frost was forecast overnight, and by the time I had gotten into the car it was pitch black.

Thank you for reading and Merry Christmas Everyone!

If you like what you see here please feel free to take a look at my portfolio site where you can see lots more of my work, or follow me on Twitter or Facebook here!

The images presented here are my intellectual property and must not be distributed without my consent.

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A White Lugnaquilla – Episode II

Ah!
The long awaited sequel (long awaited by me, that is!) to my earlier post – A White Lugnaquilla.
I’ve often said that Lugnaquilla is a hill in summer, but a mountain in winter – and I still maintain this view.
I am not going to lie, I found this day tough, it was very cold (high of -4°C, low of -8°C : not including wind chill), I was carrying a lot of gear and I was SUPER tired that morning!
For the last few weeks, there has been a reasonable amount of snow at Lugnaquilla – but the weather has been pretty poor on the weekends (nice in the week when I was at work of course!) and hill fog was the order of the day, until finally – a break!
High clouds were forecast, but few low clouds – I was not worried about overcast skies, but I was not interested in hill fog (low clouds).

So, taking my usual route – up Camara Hill, past the two Corrigs then up and onto Lug itself. A 05:00 start meant that I would have a reasonable amount of time on the mountains (sunrise was 08:30 and sunset 16:06). I think I got home (from memory) at around 18:30. A long day.
A route I have taken many times, and will take many more times – I love this route. It’s a constant climb all the way to the top, and I almost always see multiple herds of deer en route. There are many other route choices of course, and I have taken them all (except the technical ones) – but with this route you can usually drive to the start point regardless of the weather – the other routes require driving on the mountain roads. These roads are not treated in winter, and the typical advice is to stay away from them if there is snow and ice about. I am a proficient driver but I do not own a 4X4, and even then – it would appear that using a 4X4 only really gets you ‘further into trouble’ when the mountain roads are impassable due to snow/ice. I don’t like risks, otherwise I would play the lottery.

Heading up Camara Hill on this morning was a tough old slog. Lots of snow about, some ice as well. I was also super tired, due to a lack of good sleep the night before. My Dad refers to this ascent as 25 minutes of purgatory, but on this occasion it was more like 45 minutes of purgatory! Slow going. I had not done a walk greater than 10 kilometres for a few weeks, and this was most certainly felt on the ascent!
Near the top of Camara Hill now, and a pause for a pre-dawn shot of Keadeen Mountain was welcome.
Keadeen copy.jpg

At this point, I was overtaken by a ‘Lug regular’ that I had met a few times before, Kevin, and his mate – Simon. They both had ice axes and were aiming for the North Prison of Lugnaquilla. We chatted for a while, and then they moved out with haste! I would not have been able to keep up with them by any means – but, I was carrying about 5 times the weight of their packs I suspect!

A wider angle shot of Keadeen, just below the summit of Camara Hill.
Keadeen 35 copy.jpg

The sun still not up yet, but I was under no illusions – the overcast skies meant there was not going to be a lot of colour as the sun rose. At this point, I did not know the ‘fog’ status of Lug yet, i.e. was it in fog or clear. I had not seen it yet because it is hidden as you climb Camara hill, and it was dark at the time I was at the viewing points of Lug prior to the climb of Camara.

Finally, at the top of Camara now, and the ‘fog’ status is revealed. Yep, it’s in fog. Not unusual! It’s always disappointing though – after the purgatory of Camara Hill. I had faith, however, that the fog would pass.
The sun is up now, though not much a sunrise due to the cloud cover. The ‘blue hour’ is over now.
Camara Summit copy.jpg

Here, I saw a herd of deer running northwards over the saddle between Camara Hill and Lower Corrig. I often see a herd (or several) here, always moving north – near dawn. I found it curious that they always head this direction – north from there takes you into the artillery range. I suppose there would be no humans there at least!Deer Herd II copy.jpg

Frozen grass tufts between Camara and Lower Corrig.
Tufts copy.jpg

Shortly after the above shot, I turned to see a familiar Border Collie about 50 meters away. Another couple of ‘lug regulars’ – Damian and his dog! I walked back towards him, thinking to myself that he probably doesn’t recognise me in my new jacket! We walked and chatted from there up through Lower Corrig, and then up to Upper Corrig. He (like Kevin & Simon) also had designs on the North Prison, and came equipped with his ice axe. A funny coincidence, the last time I was in this area (a few weeks ago) I met both Kevin and Damian separately on ascent and ended up descending Camara Hill with the pair of them. On this day, I mentioned to Damian that Kevin was in (or more correctly, en route to) the Prison, and Damian started looking for footprints in the snow to follow! Lug regulars indeed.

Looks like Lug might clear of fog after all.
Lug Fog copy.jpg

Continuing on the journey now, as Lug clears. Damian pointed out a herd of deer over on the slopes of Slievemaan mountain. Thanks mate! My longer lens was left at home unfortunately, but I like the image my Zeiss 100mm delivered here. Oh! For a 400mm lens! Perhaps I should take more risks, and start playing the lotto!
Deer Herd III copy.jpg

Damian & Dog parted ways with myself just after Upper Corrig – he wanted to drop over to the North Prison, and my route took me up a much gentler incline (no ice axe required) – though still a steep one.Damian copy.jpg

Pausing for a breather, and some breakfast (a banana and a piece of shortbread), I liked the arctic feel of the rocks.Arctic Corrig copy.jpg

So tired! I was really feeling this hike this day. Punishing.
But I must press on, it’s so beautiful.

The final slope up to Lug is always a tough pull. But this day, it was something else. About an hour of quadruple purgatory, I reckon.
Breath pause halfway up, and a shot over to Ballineddan & Keadeen. B & K copy.jpg

Further up now, and the climate is a touch more arctic.
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The jumbled mica-schist rocks that lie about the face of this slope tell a story of high winds and freeze thaw conditions the previous day.

Almost at the summit now, and much gentler work ahead. Looking back over to Slievemaan, Ballineddan and Keadeen again, higher this time!
Frozen Dice copy.jpg

No shortage of snow alright! Just how I like it.
A hazy and overcast day, but very light winds. A beautiful day really. You don’t always want blue skies in the mountains, after all.
This military post, however, shows signs of some serious winds on the previous days!
Frozen Post copy.jpg

At the summit now, well worth the hard work!Frozen Cairn copy.jpg

A hazy view down to Aughavannagh from near the summit.
Hazy Aughavannagh copy.jpg

As I sit here scrolling through my images, and type this blog – I am reminded of the cold on this day! I am freezing! But I did not feel cold on the day. I have good clothing.
Time to turn the heating on, I reckon.

Brrr…..
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The cliffs of Lugcoolmeen. It had started to get a bit foggy shortly after this, not unusual, and not a great surprise.
Lugcoolmeen copy.jpg

I sat here (in my ski trousers) and decided to have a nibble. Yum! Starbar! I love these. I only seem to buy them for my visits to Lug, however, and it has become a part of my ‘Lug ritual’ at this point. No Starbar, no Lug – and vice-versa. At a push, a Snickers or Double Decker will do, but Starbar is where it’s at.

The fog was thin, and short lived – it cleared up rapidly. Great news!
To get the following shot of the cliffs of the South Prison, I had to stand in a ‘less than safe’ place – but it was totally worth it.
Lugcoolmeen II copy.jpg

A similar comment applies to this shot (i.e. standing in a dodgy spot!).
Lugcoolmeen III copy.jpg

But then! Disaster struck! The great scholars of the future will write legends about the following event for millennia…
I went to open my rucksack using the ‘ease of access’ zip on the front of the pack, but the puller mechanism must have frozen so when I pulled to close the zipper (it of course, opened fine), the slider just disintegrated as I pulled it!
Great, now my bag is going to be open at the front for the rest of the day!
Ok, so they may not write about this event – but at the time it felt cataclysmic! I was now going to be worried about dropping things out of my pack for the rest of the day. Paranoid glances behind me for ‘lost luggage’ after every rough patch of terrain were ubiquitous after this!

Heading back towards the summit area now, not a busy day for Lugnaquilla, let me tell you. I saw only a handful of people this day.
I wanted to start my way back to the car now, but en route I chose to head over the North Prison, and descend the slope of Lugnaquilla hand railing it, in case the fog came down again. I know Lug well, so I know to never underestimate it.

Only a couple of hours until sunset now, and I didn’t relish the thought of descending the steep slope of Lug in the dark (although I was equipped for such an eventuality – always be prepared!).
I took another shot of the frozen post, I found this very interesting.
Frozen Post II copy.jpg

Above the North Prison now, and the sky is getting darker. It looks like there is some fog moving in actually. Chances of a whiteout are high (this happened to me last year – A White Lugnaquilla).
North Prison copy.jpg

I love winter.
Winter copy.jpg

Some fog did roll in again now, but it too was short lived.
Heading down now, hand railing the North Prison. The views here were great.
Selfie!
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Yes, it has been pointed out to me already that I look like a ‘minion’ from ‘Despicable me’. The thought actually never occurred to me! I did not go to fashion school, clearly.
Say what you like about them, but these clothes kept me warm! Bright clothes are generally a good idea when hiking, especially if alone.

Looking down to Glen Imaal.
Looking down to Glen Imaal copy.jpg

Less than an hour until sunset now, and I am nearly at the bottom of the final slope of Lugnaquilla. Mount Leinster is prominent beyond Slievemaan in this photograph.Mount Leinster copy.jpg

I also liked this scene, with the two walkers heading over to Upper Corrig as they continue their descent from Lugnaquilla.
Scale-2 copy.jpg

The frozen Little Slaney river just below the source. Gentle tones in the sky, as the sun dips lower.Little Slaney copy.jpg

I didn’t stop for photos as I descended to Camara Hill because there was a spot I wanted to get to during ‘blue hour’, after sunset – and before it got too dark. I had planned to get a shot of the deer as they leave the artillery range and head south over the Camara ridge. It was just an idea I had – I suspected that if they travel north over the ridge at dawn, then perhaps they might travel south over the ridge as night fell (I had never witnessed this before, though).

My suspicion was correct!
I do hope they are visible at this resolution, WordPress does not allow high resolution photographs to be uploaded (unless you pay). They are just down and left of centre, three small dark figures.
Deer Lug copy.jpg

Getting dark, and much colder as I took this final shot. Now, for the descent of Camara Hill, which I always dislike after a long (though wonderful) day at Lug!

Thank you for reading!

If you like what you see here please feel free to take a look at my portfolio site where you can see lots more of my work, or follow me on Twitter or Facebook here!

The images presented here are my intellectual property and must not be distributed without my consent.

Camenabologue Via The Table Track

I have not visited Camenabologue for years, and never from this direction.
The last time I was here was way back on the 20th September, 2013. For that visit, I started from the valley of Glenmalure.
This time, I wanted to approach it from the Glen Imaal side, to see the views from the south western side of the mountain.

It’s one of the more remote spots in Wicklow, and I was expecting to see only a few die-hard walkers on this trip (my suspicions were correct! I saw only one group of four).

The weather forecast on the day was for calm winds and partly cloudy skies, with a chance of rain. So, in the hills of Wicklow – an almost certainty of rain!
The route started at a regular starting point of mine – Fenton’s Pub in the Glen of Imaal.
From here, I would walk a couple of kilometres on the road, past the entrance to Leitrim Graveyard, and the ruins of Leitrim Barracks and up to the forest track at “Tim’s Crossroad” – a crossroad near the Knickeen Ogham Stone of Imaal. You can see more information about this area on my post about a hike to Knocknamunnion. I would be following the same journey for the most part, but I would be going much further this day – following the Table Track up and on to Camenabologue itself.

This route is one of only two approved routes near/within the Glen of Imaal Army Artillery range (the other route being the route up Camara Hill to Lugnaquilla – one I know very well!), so it’s best to check in with the warden office before planning to take this route. And of course, it cannot be done when the army are using the range.

Camenabologue ( ‘step/pass of the bullocks’) rests in a magnificent area, an area I am very familiar with and find fascinating personally. Camenabologue forms one of the high walls that cut off Glen Imaal from its neighbouring valley – Glenmalure.

A short walk down from the pub, at Seskin Bridge (passing over the river Slaney), the first view over to Lugnaquilla presented itself. In fog – not unusual for a September morning!
Lug from Seskin Bridge copy.jpg

Autumn is just about here now in Wicklow, the leaves are turning all sorts of hues of gold and yellow but have not yet fallen at the time of this walk – but I am fairly sure the next winds will start to bring them down in earnest.
Seskin Road copy.jpg

Moving beyond the crossroads now, I took a short detour into the forest to take a quick snap of the Ogham Stone. This stone stands about 8 feet high, with an Ogham inscription reading “Maqi Nili” – I think this translates approximately to ‘Of the son of Neill/Niall’. Ogham is an ancient British and Irish alphabet, consisting of twenty characters formed by parallel strokes on either side of or across a continuous line.
Ogham copy.jpg

Leaving the stone now, there are a couple of kilometres to walk on forest tracks now, until we reach the first of two (rather rugged and worn) wooden footbridges.
From the forest track here, an interesting perspective of Lugnaquilla can be obtained. I used the equivalent of a 300mm lens for this long range shot of the cliffs of the north prison. A cloudy day, alright.
Lug from forest track copy.jpg

After these bridges, a steep (though short) climb up the northern flank of Knocknamunnion brings you out onto open hillside.
At a junction in the trail at Knocknamunnion, you are reminded not to stray from the approved route.
Stay on route copy.jpg

As the day unfolded, the weather showed small chances of hope in the form of clearing skies. However, it was drizzling over the Glen of Imaal as I climbed up the table track at Knocknamunnion. The view here is very pleasing, even in such gloomy conditions.
Drizzle Imaal copy.jpg

The table track itself is an ancient path that connects the valleys Glenmalure and Glen of Imaal. The name ‘Table Track’ I assume comes from the fact that the path gives easy access to ‘Table Mountain’ – the nearest northerly neighbour of my target for the day (Camenabologue being my target).
I have also heard of the track being known as the ‘Black-Banks Road’ – presumably the black banks referring to the large black peat hags at the top of the road. I also read somewhere that J.B. Malone referred to this track as ‘The Stony Road To Imaal’. I can understand why – further up the track, the terrain gets a bit rougher and comprises of mostly stones and wet peat. Here, it is nice soft grass though. Look! The sun came out!
Table Track copy.jpg

Climbing higher now, and I have two choices. There is a junction in the track. I can head left and take the longer, less arduous approach to the high point of the track (between Table Mountain and Camenabologue itself), or I can take the stonier, steeper but more direct approach to the high point. Naturally, I chose the latter. I think the latter is probably known as the ‘Stoney Road’ and the former may just be a continuation of the Table Track itself.
As I reach the col between the two mountains, the name ‘Black Banks Road’ struck me as being a rather obvious choice for the track name. Place names in Wicklow often are purely descriptive as opposed to imaginative, it could perhaps be argued!
Black Banks c.jpg

Mullaghcleevaun looms beyond at left, and Tonelagee at right – Wicklow’s second and third highest mountains.
Looking north at the col between Table Mountain and Camenabologue, here is the ‘dog leg’ track that I opted to skip in favour of the slightly more arduous approach. I love the yellows here at this time of year.Table Track Elbow copy.jpg

From here, the summit of Camenabologue is only a short distance to the south, so on I went.
As I ascend higher, the sky is gaining an almost chrome-like, liquid metal appearance. The weather in Ireland is very changeable, and swift in its transformation – blink and you’d miss it!
Heavy rain was forecast for the evening, and I did not particularly want to get caught out in it – a sense of foreboding arrived with these skies though.
Camenabologue Cairn copy.jpg

Beyond the cairn in the shot above, sits Cannow mountain and Lugnaquilla itself.
Also visible from here, using a long lens is Cloghernagh Mountain and the Peat hags of Benleagh.
Cloghernagh copy.jpg

The north-eastern slopes of Lugnaquilla, before they plunge down to Fraughan Rock Glen.
NE Lug copy.jpg

Thinking about heading back now – back the way I came. Quite a walk back and the sky looks increasingly threatening.

Back at the col between the two summits now, and I take a shot looking over to the partially forested Lobawn and the Wexford Gap. I liked the rebellious trees that (presumably are self planted) sat higher up the slopes and chose to grow away from the ordered plantations below.
Lobawn copy.jpg

Further down now, and it started to drizzle a bit. Also, Camenabologue itself became enshrouded with fog.
Back down the wet side of Knocknamunnion and crossing a footbridge, over Oiltiagh Brook, places you back at the Coillte forest track, near the start of the journey. Some of the forestry has been felled here, providing a nice view over to Lugnaquilla in this autumnal scene.
Lug Autumn-2 copy.jpg

Thank you for reading!

If you like what you see here please feel free to take a look at my portfolio site where you can see lots more of my work, or follow me on Twitter or Facebook here!

The images presented here are my intellectual property and must not be distributed without my consent.

The Five C’s

Multiple prehistoric megalithic tombs, four mountain summits, a clear weather forecast and great company, what more could you ask for on a Saturday?

The “four C’s” is a circuit walk in the north Wicklow/Dublin mountains. It is more popularly known as the Kilbride Circuit but I prefer to refer to it as the “The Four C’s”.
This moniker originates in the names of the four mountains that the circuit navigates – Seahan (also known as Seechon), Corrig, Seefingan and Seefin.

I opted to do this walk clockwise, starting with an initial attack on Seahan/Seechon.
The plan was to then cross the boggy gap between Seahan and Corrig, cross another (even boggier!) gap from Corrig to Seefingan – the highest summit of the day – and finally descend to Seefin – in my opinion: the superior summit of the four (hence saving it until last!). These are all places I have visited many times for their own sake, except Seefingan – it is a bit ‘out on a limb’.
Being close to Dublin, Seefin and Seahan make for great evening walks in the summer time however.

There is lots of interest in these summits, certainly from an historical point of view at least. The mountains themselves are generally quite featureless (we shall see the exception to the ‘generally’ clause later).
Navigation can be tricky in this area in poor visibility, due to aforementioned featureless terrain and there is the danger of the Kilbride rifle range that must not be strayed into.

This is a great walk, and by the end of the day my pedometer clocked in a distance of 15km – I did make some minor detours for photographs and I believe that usually this walk is around 11km.

‘But Phil, why is the title of the blog post “The five C’s”?’ I hear you cry…
Well, because I had my best hiking pal Casper the Bichon Frise with me on this walk! He made up the extra ‘C‘! We shall hear more about him later. But I will say this about him for now – he is a Trooper!

Anyway, on with this day’s walk. The start of the journey involves a gentle climb through a gap in the (ever maturing) sitka spruce plantations. I remember these trees being much smaller back in ’13. They grow up so fast eh?!

Further up the trail, and the sky is looking a bit dramatic. The forecast had said sunny spells, but when in the hills of Wicklow – all four seasons in one day is the norm!
Sky copy.jpg

Further up the trail, there is a great view west, beyond the shoulder of Cupidstown Hill over to the plains of Kildare. Cupidstown Hill is the highest point in County Kildare (though it is small – only ~380m above sea level) and named after Oliver Cromwell’s gun, I believe. Nice, clear weather for the moment.
Kildare copy.jpg

From here, there is also a nice view over to the Poulaphouca Reservoir at Blessington.
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Please stay like this – weather!

So, the first summit of the day – Seahan. According to logainm.ie, the Anglicised name ‘Seahan’ comes from the Irish ‘An Suíochán’ – in plain English this translates to ‘The Seat’. This is a mountain I have had a long relationship with. It is one of the first mountains in Ireland that I had attempted to climb (the first I actually climbed was Djouce mountain and then Kippure mountain – both on the same day in fact).
But Seahan was the first one that I had visited, I just did not get to the top on that particular day. That first time that I went here, Seahan was covered in deep frozen snow. I have memories of deliberately sliding down the slopes here because it was easier than walking down! That was all the way back in March 2013!
Ah, to be young again.
Casper has also climbed this summit at least five times before – he is most definitely not a ‘lap-dog’!

Getting near the summit now, and the view beyond the Kilbride Rifle range to Seefingan (at left, the highest summit of the day) and Seefin (to the right of Seefingan, in shade – the last summit of the day) is great.
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It looks like a lot of ground to cover, and the second summit (Corrig) is not even shown in the above photograph. But that’s the thing about hiking – the appearances of distances can be very deceiving.
The sky is looking like it could go one of two ways : clear up nicely, or get cloudier. We shall see what the Weather Gods of Wicklow have in store for us!

There are numerous memorial plaques in the hills of Dublin and Wicklow – and there is one just below the summit of Seahan/Seechon – dedicated to an ‘Alan Nolan’ here. I do not know who he was but this is a wonderful place for such a memorial.Alan Nolan copy.jpg

Switching to my favourite long range lens now (the Zeiss 100mm) and the view over to Seefin mountain is quite pleasing. The dark terrain feature slicing down the mountain is a re-entrant known as ‘The Slade’ according to my map (at centre). I whimsically refer to it as ‘The Slide’. But I am silly like that.  Rising above the top of the ‘slide’ is Mullaghcleevan, the second highest mountain in Wicklow and just right of that in the far distance is the Monarch of Wicklow herself – Lugnaquilla.
The small ‘bump’ at the top of Seefin is a large megalithic tomb. We shall see this up close later!
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At the top of Seahan now, and atop one of the three (that I know of) burial cairns here is a rather battered looking Ordnance Survey Trigonometrical Station. Getting quite a bit cloudier, I fancy. It is warm though.
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This cairn is about 2 meters high and 24 meters in diameter and all of the cairns on these mountains most likely date to the Neolithic period, more than 5,000 years ago. The tombs are believed to be the remnants of passage tombs, a type of burial tomb that appears as a large round mound of stones, encircled by large stones set on their edges to form a kerb structure. Parallel lines of upright stones created a passageway leading to a chamber which usually contained the remains the revered dead.
The view over the city of Dublin is notable from up here.

The other tomb (a shattered wedge tomb) lies a short journey to the west of here, but I did not take a photograph of it this day because it was unfortunately covered with the remains of some form of barbeque. Not terribly respectful of the local ancient ancestors I think you’ll agree.
The winds will blow it away, and the tomb will remain, I guess. I was not really in a position to ‘litter pick’ this day I am afraid as I was carrying a lot of camera gear and water for Casper and I. A shame though. I have taken many photographs of this tomb before, but I am trying only to share images I took this day on this post. There will be other posts about this walk in the future, I am sure :).

The first summit of the day for Little Casper! Seven years old and still rocking it! Top chap!
He is so fast but usually he opts to stay right behind me on these walks, he never leaves me – unless there is some good heather sniffing to be done of course. He might leave me then but soon realise that whilst he has stopped – I have not! At which point he frantically rushes towards me once I am more than 5 meters away!
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Casper is a rescue dog, and as a result of his previous life experience, he has some anxiety problems. I would consider him sort of an ‘autistic dog’ if such a thing exists –  I do not know about that.
He does not like dogs that he does not know, he also does not like things that might be considered strange to a little dog, or things that disrupt his routine. Cyclists might be an example, loud noises or other ‘exciting’ things are also triggers for him. He has a habit of ‘stacking’ his anxiety, and doesn’t let things go easily. When the stack gets too high, it gets too much and he melts down.
He really loves hill walking though. When it is just me and him roaming the hills of Wicklow he really comes alive. He loves to barrel around the peat hags and he loves to sniff the heather, especially when it is in full bloom (wait another month for that, Cas).

A short distance to the east, is another tomb – this one is a passage tomb, over 21m in diameter, with a kerb of elongated granite stones. This one I find particularly provocative.
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I could stay here all day, watching the light change on this tomb and the humps and bumps of Wicklow in the distance glow and dimmer with the passing clouds but Casper and I have a mission today.
From here, we need to head south east for a short distance to reach our second summit of the day – Corrig. It is only about 1km away, but the ground in the gap between Seahan and Corrig is awkward. It’s very wet and boggy and I once observed an abandoned army jeep stuck in the bog here. I imagine somebody was in trouble when they had to report back to HQ that they had managed to get the jeep stuck in the bog :-/.
“Not again, Private!”.

At this point, Casper and I were uncertain about what the weather was going to bring. My suspicion was for increasing cloud and possibly rain showers. Casper concurred.
We had hoped not, and I crossed my fingers, and Casper crossed his paws.
This would not be the first time that Casper and I had been caught out in the rain, and we have a strategy for this that I shall explain later.

Looking towards Corrig, with the pointy Great Sugar Loaf in the far distance and Kippure with its RTE broadcasting mast at right.
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Casper has a habit of pausing for heather sniffing opportunities as previously mentioned, but also for another reason.
He loves taking selfies!
He puts his camera on the tripod, locks it into self timer mode and then scampers over to his chosen spot for the selfie.
A clever little dog really. Here he is, in the boggy gap between Seahan and Corrig.
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Some of the heather that Casper enjoys on the eastern shoulder of Seahan. Not quite at it’s ‘purplest’ yet.Purple Heather copy.jpg

A curious find here between Seahan and Corrig, it is an old ‘War Department’ pillar, a fact revealed by the ‘WD’ inscription on it. I believe, though I am not sure – that this is a throwback to the British ‘War Department’ that used both this range and the artillery range at Glen Imaal before the Irish Defence Forces used them, as they presently do. These pillars were used to denote the boundaries of the Kilbride rifle range.
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This particular pillar looks over to Glendoo mountain, Two Rock mountain (at right) beyond and Dublin Bay (at left). In the far distance beyond the sea is the Howth peninsula (slightly left of center).

At the summit of Corrig (‘Rock’ in English) now, summit two of the day. It really is the poorest of the four summits I am afraid to say. Not offering splendid views and having no megalithic cairns (that I know of). Not much to say about it really. I am sure that good views might be had by dropping down the eastern slopes, but that was not the mission for this day.
There is another ‘WD’ pillar here, resting in a boggy pool.
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Not much wind this day at all – hence the reflections in the still pool above.
Another Casper photograph, at his second summit of the day – Corrig. He looks pretty clean still, surprisingly so – after the wet ground we just crossed.Casper at Corrig copy.jpg

Casper is a small dog (really small!) so I basically have to lie down to get to his level whilst he patiently poses for me!
After a pause here, for some water and some snacks we must start the assault on Seefingan. The highest summit of the day. Not a steep hike from here but quite a long (feeling) ascent from the boggy gap between here (Corrig) and Seefingan itself.
A gentle reminder en route.
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Some really nasty wet patches on the way to Seefingan. Poor Casper is much lower to the ground than I, but he is well trained in the art of ‘bog dodging’, or ‘bodging’ as he calls it! Bog Pool copy.jpg

Seefingan, our target, is at left above. The fingers (and paws!) crossing has done the trick for now, and we have some nice warm sunlight hitting us as we negotiate our path through this marshy gap. However, it does look as if cumulonimbus clouds are starting to tower up. These can produce sudden, and heavy rain showers. Keep an eye out, Cas.

Yes, definitely getting much cloudier now as we start the ascent of the northern slope of Seefingan.

Casper in the heather.
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I shot this wide open (f/1.4) with my 35mm lens. Only the tip of his nose is in complete focus, depth of field (or zone of focus) is razor thin wide open at this distance. I like the effect of this, and it really helps make a subject ‘pop’.
I took another version of this shot but I focused on his eye instead (usually in a portrait photograph, out of focus eyes is a big no-no) but I actually preferred the ‘nose focus’ shot to the ‘eye focus’ shot – because his nose is nearer.
But that is why I took two shots with different focus areas- options are nice to have and in the field it may not be obvious where best to place the focus for the effect you want. Experience has taught me this.
As I say, usually the eyes win but every case is different and it costs nothing to ‘bracket’ the focus in digital photography.
He is starting to look at little bit muckier now!

Partway up Seefingan, and the view north shows our journey so far – Seahan (left) and Corrig (right). Beyond Seahan and Corrig lies the sprawling city of Dublin.
Yeah, time to put the waterproof jacket on I think. The sky is moody and threatening.
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The actual summit of Seefingan (“Fingan’s Seat”) is marked only with a ‘Wicklow Mountains National Park’ post.
Casper at the summit of Seefingan. Man, it is getting dark now – the clouds overhead are thick, dark and threatening.Casper Seefingan copy.jpg

Looking over to Kippure from just east of here reveals a rather desolate area of eroded peat hags. Pretty gloomy looking, but interesting I thought.
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A long lens shot of Kippure, with the communications mast visible at the summit and War Hill and Djouce in the distance at right. The mast itself is 127 metres tall, and sits at the top of Kippure mountain – itself 757 metres above sea level. Construction of the mast was completed in the summer of 1961.
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Well, we cannot pick the weather on the weekends eh! Sun would have been nice, but if my photographs were always sunny that would be an inaccurate depiction if Wicklow. Most of the time, it is just not sunny.

A short detour from the summit to the west reveals another very impressive megalithic tomb. This one is over 25 metres in diameter and about 4 metres high. Visible on the top is another ‘WD’ pillar.
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At this point in the walk it had started to spit rain, so Casper and I decided to move on towards the final (and superior) summit of the day – Seefin (“Fionn’s Seat”).

Descending the south-western slope of Seefingan, the sky looked ever more menacing – a downpour was imminent.
The view here is pleasant, despite the grey conditions. Sorrel Hill is prominent slightly up and left of centre, with the sprawling Poulaphouca reservoir just beyond (and also to the right – below Lugnagun).
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My usual strategy for downpours when I have Casper with me is to wrap the little chap inside my waterproof jacket (whilst I am wearing it) so that he does not get totally drenched. He does own a nice jacket himself but sometimes the rain is just so heavy that he needs more protection. That was the case at this point – the heavens truly opened!
We took shelter behind a large peat hag and decided to wait it out. We thought it was never going to end! Casper insisted on poking his head through my jacket, despite my advice not to – and as a result he did get wet. But we tried to minimise this!

The rain fell straight down in vertical lines, as there was almost no wind.
25 minutes later, or so – the shower stopped and we opted to move on. Roll out autobots!
The sky was not clearing though, and looked to be darkening again.

The gap between Seefingan and Seefin is less boggy than the previous two gaps (between Seahan – Corrig and Corrig – Seefingan). So the going here was much easier, especially for Casper. The route took us to the mouth of the re-entrant known as ‘The Slade’ (or slide as I prefer!). At this point, it was only a trench a few foot deep but Casper had great fun launching himself over it – go rocket dog!

Approaching Seefin now, and a quick glance back to Seefingan (at right) also shows the first summit of the day (Seahan, at left). It looks like the sky may clear up for us as we arrive at the favourite summit of the day. Fingers & paws crossed :).
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The cairn at Seefin is a passage tomb, measuring around 25m in diameter and about 3m high. You can see a number of large kerb stones around the base of the tomb defining its outer edge. The tomb has a passageway that is roughly 10m long and opens into a chamber with five compartments. If you are small, you can climb through the doorway portal shown in the below photograph. However, I am simply not small enough!Seefin Tomb copy.jpg

Towering cumulonimbus clouds in the distance and above the Poulaphouca reservoir at right hint at thunderous downpours in that area – I think this is the remnants of what previously passed over Casper and I earlier – the wind was easterly this day and we are looking west here.

A rather poor looking Casper, at his final summit of the day. He is a bit wet from walking through wet ground here but I am not worried, it was a warm day and he is pretty used to walking with me in the rain.
I think if you ask any dog, would they rather go out for a walk (and possibly get a little bit wet) or stay at home (but be dry) the answer will always be the same!
Well done Casper!
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A colour shot of the tomb, with the view west on display.
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The doorway to a forgotten world:
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Heading off Seefin now, it’s been a long day for Casper and our lift is en route from Dublin – so we must not make them wait for us after the generous chauffeuring!

Thank you for reading!

If you like what you see here please feel free to take a look at my portfolio site where you can see lots more of my work, or follow me on Twitter or Facebook here!

The images presented here are my intellectual property and must not be distributed without my consent.

A Green Lugnaquilla

Well, I did a blog post about a White Lugnaquilla in winter, and now that it is summer and the ‘Emerald Isle’ is particularly green at the moment, I thought I’d do a post about a green Lugnaquilla!
This would be my ninth visit to this wonderful place in the last 9 months. I had visited four times prior to that, but I had to skip it for a year whilst my injuries healed and I built up my strength/fitness. I’d like to try to continue my monthly visits, so injuries – stay away!
The usual drill, early start (before 3am), park at Fentons (who were locking up as I was also locking up my car, coincidentally) and then off I go, up Camara Hill and onwards to the highest point in the east of Ireland.

Readers of my blog will know that I prefer the winter months for photography. I like the snow and the ice, and the subdued hues of winter. The light can be better too, with the sun lower in the sky. I less prefer the vibrancy of spring/summer. But every season has its positives. In summer, the days are long and on a fine day, the colours are very, well colourful!

New things this day. I have never hiked to Lugnaquilla when the forecast was for 27°C! So, that was new. Also, my old 66 litre rucksack was damaged (I had used it for years) so that needed replacing, and I also treated myself to new hiking poles! I do spoil myself…. You can see me showing off my new pack in the cover image above. You will need a monitor at least 1920 pixels wide, mind. My photographs are intended to be viewed on larger screens (not tablets or phones). Here is a smaller version, hopefully it might be more ‘phone friendly’. I am overlooking the north prison here, and I checked with the Army Warden Service (near Fenton’s Pub) if I was clear to go here, and permission was given. Always check with the warden when doing this walk, the artillery range is extremely dangerous and has unexploded ordnance.
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Some may wonder why I revisit this place again and again. It’s different each time, and there are many things to see here. The light is always different, the atmosphere always different. I try not to replicate photographs that I have previously taken (unless I am comparing the seasons), and this creates a challenge that I enjoy. It helps creativity and pushes me to explore just that bit further.

Near the start of the day, just as I had arrived at the first summit of Camara Hill. The sun had just started to rise.Deer copy.jpg

Many deer this morning! Even at this low resolution, you should be able to see them in the foreground.
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My plan for this day was to skirt the north prison cliffs on my ascent, head to the summit and then enter the very head of the north prison itself. I then wanted to head over to the great gully of the south prison and finally make my return journey via the ascent route near the north prison cliffs. I cannot stress enough the importance of communicating your plans with the Glen Imaal Defence Forces Information Centre. There is a phone number on the Mountaineering Ireland website that you can call for information, or you can do what I prefer to do and that is – pop in and show them your plans on a map. I’d like to add that I cleared my plans for this day with the warden in the office. If you plan to do a similar (or a slight deviation of this) route then you must check in with the warden. I am not responsible if you do this route, then end up straying into the impact zone – that is your responsibility. All I can do is advise you that you must check in with the warden!

6.21 am, and I am nearing the final push up to Lug itself alongside the north prison rim. The sun is quite high already, it rose over an hour ago at this stage. The angle will soon be perfect for the shot I had in mind for the north prison. I had better bust-a-move on!
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Beside the great cliffs of the north prison now, and in my peripheral vision I sense movement on the cliffs. A hare! I have never seen this before!
Super fast reflexes on my part to manually focus my (manual focus only) Zeiss 100mm lens and I managed to get a shot. Wow, a rare sight. It looked as if s/he was enjoying the view as much as I was!Hare copy.jpg

From here, the view down the glen to the Sugar Loaf of West Wicklow is green, green, green!
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A very clear atmosphere this morning, I can pick out tiny details on the rocks of the glen floor, several kilometers away. Quite rare, especially at this time of year (winter often provides a less turbulent and clearer atmosphere).

More animals, this time – sheep – on the summit plateau – also known as “Percy’s Table”. Sheep copy.jpg

The view slightly west of north from where I leave the summit area to descend into the north prison (I only descended a small bit into the prison itself). Many of Wicklow’s summits can be seen from here. Tonelagee, Turlough Hill and Djouce are particularly prominent.
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Found my spot in the prison, time for a sarnie I think. Ham & lettuce (my usual), followed by some grapes. Good snack!
This is the spot where I took the cover image, and below are a couple more shots (minus me) of the area. Expansive view here!
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Look at that clear sky!
One might wish for clouds, for a bit of drama – but, Gah! Who cares. Sometimes it’s nice to be out in nice weather! It is quite rare to get such a nice day on a weekend day in Ireland. Especially at Lugnaquilla.
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Tough work though, such a hot day and I carry so much gear. But great fun.
Heading back up now, and the next plan for the day is actioned. Hop on over to the great gully of the south prison.
But I took a short detour towards Cloghernagh mountain before this, I always enjoy the view back over to Lug from here.
Hanging off the cliffs near Lugcoolmeen here, a wide view of the south prison is revealed. To get a shot like this with a wide angle lens, you need to be at the precipice, proper. I got some funny looks when coming back up from here, let me tell you haha!
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A long range view now, looking down beyond the forested slopes of Corrigasleggaun, and over to Croghan Kinsella. Crogan Kinsella copy.jpg

Next location – the great gully (also known as “McAlpine’s Back Passage” of the south prison. Autobots, roll out!
I always pause and take this shot, it’s one of my personal favourite views up here. Looking over to Cloghernagh (at left) and Corrigasleggaun (right). I wish my wordpress account allowed higher resolution photographs to be uploaded, but I believe you have to pay for that facility. But at the higher resolution version I have of this, the detail is outstanding. You can pick out every rock very clearly, and zoom right in for crazy details.
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A close up of one of the jagged rocks near the summit area.Jagged copy.jpg

At my spot now, peering down the great gully.
It’s possible to climb up here, very steep terrain though and not something you ought to be doing as a solo hiker (as I am).
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A wider shot of the gully, with the surrounding mountains to the east on show.
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I sat here for a while, contemplating the views and drinking my third litre of water! I had brought 5 litres this day. And drank it all! It was super hot.
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After a while, I decided to head back towards the north prison, and begin my descent.
I had been on the mountains for six hours at this stage.
Passing the familiar ‘dice’ of Lugnaquilla, I paused for a shot. I always shoot this rocky outcrop!
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Descending now, and the view down to Glen of Imaal and the surrounding area is amazing from here. As the day is pressing on, the colours are coming alive a bit more.
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Look! Another animal! Bertie the beetle :-D. Enjoying a snack I see. Eating Lugnaquilla! hold up mate, don’t eat it all – I plan to come back here!
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My last photograph of the day – over 12 hours from the start of my day I might add! Yes, I was tired and hot and at this point I was CRAVING an ice cream. I must have needed the sugar and electrolytes. You have no idea how grateful I was when I stopped at the Glen Imaal store (I think there is only one shop in the glen) and they had my favourite – Cornetto King Cone! Words cannot express how heavenly it was. I think that hiking over 27 km’s in 20°C+ temperatures earns it!
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Please do remember what I said about checking in with the Army Warden when planning to approach (or walk in the vicinity of) Lugnaquilla or in the Glen of Imaal.

Thank you for reading!

If you like what you see here please feel free to take a look at my portfolio site where you can see lots more of my work, or follow me on Twitter or Facebook here!

The images presented here are my intellectual property and must not be distributed without my consent.

A Hot Day At Keadeen

Wow!
Another beautiful sunny day on the weekend!
I am being spoilt.
Thank you Weather Gods!

Obviously wanting to return to Lugnaquilla (for my hat trick in 3 weeks), I decided not to at the last minute. My plan was to get up early and catch the sunrise on the slopes above Upper Corrig almost at Lug itself. But I was remembering how much pain my feet and legs had given me the previous week after my second visit in the last two weeks to Lugnaquilla. Not wanting to aggravate my Plantar Fasciitis and Achilles Tendonitis, I opted for a gentler hike this time.

I wanted to start early, but in all honesty – I just could not stir myself from my slumber this day. So a lie-in was had and I rolled (groggily) out of bed at 8am. Sacrilege!
I rarely lie in, but I obviously needed it. Anyway, on to the walk!

Parking just above the Dwyer-McAllister Cottage, I left my car in first gear with the handbrake firmly engaged (the parking area is on a steep slope). I am paranoid about car roll backs in my absence so I always place the steering wheel so that if the car were to roll, the direction of rollage would spill the car away from danger (ditches, roads etc.). Yeah, I am weird and worry about things like that.

Being an (almost) isolated summit in the deep south-west of Wicklow, Keadeen (‘flat-topped hill’ according to Mountain Views, ‘Fortgranite’ according to Google Translate) offers supremely commanding views over south Wicklow and parts of Carlow. It also offers an impressive view of the Lugnaquilla massif and the Glen of Imaal. I say almost isolated, as its twin peak – known as Carrig – stands less than two kilometers away and is less than one hundred meters shorter and so prevents the solitude of Keadeen itself.

Again, a walk I have done many times and will do many more times I suspect. It’s not a tough walk but it’s good for a calf stretcher. The last pull up to the flat summit can be a work out.

A layer of fog at the start of the walk, but my suspicion was that a combination of heat from the sun and the wind would dissipate this. Fog Trees copy.jpg

This area suffered an intense fire a year or so ago – perhaps more, I do not know exactly when it occurred, I did not witness it. I just came here one day and the ground was scorched. The vegetation is slow to heal (hence the tortured appearance in the above photograph).

As suspected, it looks like the fog is clearing now, revealing blue skies above:Fog Clearing copy.jpg

Oops, hang about, I was mistaken – it’s back again!Fog Returns copy.jpg

Ok, now it is clearing!Fog Clearing II copy.jpg

And now we can see the Monarch of Wicklow – Lugnaquilla – looming above Ballinedan and Slievemaan mountains.Fog Clearing III copy.jpg

And Lugnaquilla is unveiled:Lugnaquilla copy.jpg

Part of the north prison and the ridge of Camara Hill visible at left, to centre, in the photograph. From this angle, it looks a long walk to approach Lug from Camara. It is. I should know (See : Tranquility And Changing Seasons At Lugnaquilla, A White Lugnaquilla, A Frosty Log Na Coille, A Wintry Hike To Lugnaquilla, A Return To Log Na Coille, Lugnaquilla From Fenton’s Bar – The Sequel, Lugnaquilla from Fenton’s Bar, A return to Camara Hill, A Camera at Camara Hill – a glimpse of greater things – wow. I must approach Lug from a different route next time!).

Anyway, moving on and up – a small sapling caught my eye:Sapling copy.jpg

Taken using my new Zeiss Milvus 100m f/2. This is very quickly becoming my favourite lens. It is simply a joy to use, and a tool that is fun to use is a tool that will get used often.

The flattish ground just before the last pull up to Keadeen is very wet in parts, so some careful dodging of bog pools and sucking soft ground is required. Like a large proportion of the Wicklow Mountains really! I don’t mind, soft ground is good for arthritic joints.

Further up the final slope to the summit of Keadeen now, and a quick pause for a breath (and a quick snap of course).Lug II copy.jpg

Near the summit area now, and looking south to Mount Leinster. Some fog rolling clinging to the lower slopes.Mount Leinster copy.jpg

One wishes for a clear atmosphere AND sun but one can wish all one likes! Bring back bright and clear winter days please.
At the summit now, with the ordnance survey trig pillar and a large summit cairn beyond. A lovely bright day. And HOT!Trig copy.jpg

The origin of the cairn is a mystery to me – I have heard two accounts. One is that the cairn is a prehistoric burial tomb and the second account states that it was built by hill walkers. I like to think it’s a bit of both – that there was indeed a prehistoric cairn at this site, but it was damaged and has since been reconstructed by hill walkers. But I honestly don’t know – I stand to be corrected on this!

Quite a hazy day now, a thin layer of mist in the atmosphere. Hampering absolute sharpness on long range imagery but nearby views were acceptable. There was also atmospheric blurring occurring (Astronomical Seeing was poor due to a turbulent atmosphere). This can be critical when using long lenses for long range photographs, and will be a large factor that you cannot control affecting photograph sharpness and clarity. The effect would be missed by most, but a critical photographic eye will know it when they see it.

Windy up here, at the top. And quite cool too actually. Jacket time. Also snack time! YUM!!! These are my favourite walking snacks. Snacks copy.jpg

I also enjoy flapjacks and an occasional Lion Bar. If I am planning on Lug, I will treat myself to a Lion Bar!

From the summit cairn, the views are quite remarkable really. Looking to the west here there is low cloud in the far distance but closer lie Spinans Hill (right) and Cloghnagaune (left) and in the distance Baltinglass Hill.Cairn View copy.jpg

Spinans Hill is very curious and a place I plan to visit at some stage in the near future (I have not been yet). There is a hill fort (known as Brusselstown Ring) on the south east part of the hill and from Keadeen it looks most interesting. Apparently, it is Europe’s largest hill fort. Cool!Brusselstown copy.jpg

Looking northerly now, over Glen Imaal and towards Donard. What a view, and so green! Church Mountain at the back at middle, the slopes of Lobawn to the left and the Sugarloaf of West Wicklow at right. Also visible here is the Coolmoney army camp of Glen Imaal (slightly left of center).Glen Imaal copy.jpg

Another view over to Church Mountain.Fence copy.jpg

Time to head back now, I had left my sandwich in the car (accidentally) and I was starving! This is not the first time I had forgotten to take my lunch from the boot of my car whilst out hiking, and I dare say it won’t be the last!

Detouring a little from the path towards the east reveals a fine view of Lugnaquilla and the Camara Hill ridge.Lug 50mm copy.jpg

A view of Croaghanmoira and the forestry that I was handrailing on the way up during the fog. Croaghanmoira copy.jpg

Thank you for reading!

If you like what you see here please feel free to take a look at my portfolio site where you can see lots more of my work, or follow me on Twitter or Facebook here!

The images presented here are my intellectual property and must not be distributed without my consent.

Tranquility And Changing Seasons At Lugnaquilla

After many weekends of grey skies and wet walks – finally; a break in the misery.
Saturday 25th March was set to be a fantastic day judging by the forecasts. And fantastic it was.
So….. Where did I go? Well, I think readers of this blog will know where I went!

Many kilometers to hike, lots of boot sucking bog to tackle, many views to see. Rock strewn slopes to dodge through, gullies to sit atop and a ‘loaner’ lens to test. A loaner lens because the brand new Zeiss Milvus 135mm lens I purchased revealed itself to have a very soft corner on one side. Even at f/8. Not acceptable really. So, back to the shop it went.

In the last couple of months I have been trying to obtain a decent 135mm prime lens for landscape work. I enjoy shooting longer lenses for landscapes, more so than wide angle lenses actually. I think photography can be an ‘art of exclusion’, so with a long lens, you can exclude easier!

Only a few simple criteria needed to be met by the lens I was searching for. The lens needed to be sharp, and it needed to sharp across the entire image frame. Not just sharp in the center – sharp across the entire image. Not an unreasonable expectation for a prime (non zoomable) lens I don’t think?
Well, after 3 different samples of 135mm lenses (2 Samyang/Rokinon and 1 Zeiss Milvus) – it would appear so. Buying new lenses for a high resolution camera is, well, a bit stressful if I am honest. I am quite experienced with testing lenses and I have very high demands/expectations of new equipment. New equipment is very expensive, so I have every right to be picky I believe.

High resolution imagery places large demands on glass (lenses) placed in front of the sensor and lens flaws will be revealed, certainly. Similarly, flaws that originate from behind the sensor will be revealed equally. By that – I mean photographer flaws. Nobody, and nothing is perfect.

I will talk about this more later.
But for now, the journey begins!

Up bright and early as per usual for me. I took this one at 7am whilst walking up the forest path toward good old Camara Hill. The mountain Keadeen looms beyond this row of trees. The lens I was borrowing from my favourite local camera shop (Conns Cameras – by the way, wonderful customer service guys.) was a 100mm Makro Planar f/2 Zeiss lens. This was my first shot with the lens, shot wide open at f/2, manually focussed in live view on the trees. What a delightful little lens, almost zero field curvature (nearly flat zone of focus/depth of field). This meant that if I was parallel with the row of trees, I could get all of the trees in the same zone of focus with f/2. So that’s what I did!Keadeen Trees copy.jpg

Now, I always manually focus my lenses for landscape photography. With the Zeiss 100mm, it has no autofocus, so there is no choice. But I am happy with this. Manual focus gives much better results than autofocus (unless I mess up – this is not unknown, I am human after all. Plus I do suffer from terrible short sightedness and astigmatism – like certain wide angle lenses I might add!). Besides, I also find manual focus is a much more intimate way to connect with and capture nature, it forces me to think about what the subject really is, in the above case – the trees. Everything else in the shot is ‘contextual background’.

As this is my favourite walk, I have become intimately familiar with it over the last 6 months or so. More than twenty five times I have done at least part of this walk in the past half year. It never gets old, it always looks different. Below is shown the final stretch of forest track that leads you up to the slopes of Camara Hill. From here the journey gets a little tougher. Up onto open hillside and the gradient steepens. My father describes the ascent of Camara as ‘Twenty minutes of purgatory’! Well, it was a humid day when I took him and my mother up there, so the description was warranted!Track to Camara copy.jpg

Well, winter is over now here in Ireland. Much to my dismay! I do enjoy clear days in winter, but with spring comes new opportunities. The gorse has already started it’s luminous and coconut-fragranced return! Bokeh!Gorse.jpg

Depth of field (zone of focus) is minimal in the above shot. Only the very tip of the gorse bud is in sharp focus. A tricky enough photograph to capture, by the time focus is spot on – the bud could have been moved by the wind, and thus thrown out of the zone of focus. I won’t lie, I did not get this focussed exactly how I wanted it first time (see note above about flaws behind the sensor!).

At the top of Camara now, and a familiar view to myself is revealed. Also a familiar view to Michael Dwyer (the United Irishmen leader in the 1798 rebellion against the English). I believe he was born near the foot of this hill and fought for freedom for Ireland from within these secluded glens.

The sky was like a painting at this time of day, not too long after sunrise with the sun beyond Lugnaquilla itself. The last patches of snow are resisting the slow thaw. But their time is coming to an end.Lugnaquilla Sky copy.jpg

Looking at smaller views now, using the Macro lens I am borrowing. A lone grass blade shooting through the tortured and weathered surface of the peat.I stand alone copy.jpg

A few rest breaks required, Camara Hill ascent was tough this day. Lack of sleep the night before and a hectic week at work. But these breaks offered the chance to try the macro capabilities of the Milvus 100mm. Added bonus : I got to lie down for a little rest taking these shots!

Another close up, this time further up the mountain. Hitting the snow patches now, probably the last of the snow until autumn/winter 2017. Spring breaks through!
Blade copy.jpg

Again, an admirable performance from the lens. Depth of field/zone of focus is so shallow at close range on a 36 megapixel camera. Only the little orange ‘knot’ almost halfway up the grass blade is in perfect focus at f/2.8.

A quick stroll to the summit now, with a snow patched Gravale, Carrigvore and Kippure mountain chain in the distance beyond. Summit copy.jpg

Amazing weather and not a soul to be seen! Never have I experienced such beautiful and calm (almost no wind) conditions at my favourite place outdoors. Often it is foggy, cold, wet and windy! By the time I had got to the summit this day, I had taken all of my outer torso layers off and I was just in my thermal T-shirt. Amazing, only a month ago I was in my full winter gear (see A White Lugnaquilla).

A beautiful day indeed.
But don’t worry, I can always find something to complain about! There was some mild ‘atmospheric lensing’, or heat shimmer (temperature differential) occurring. This was hampering long range views. This will get worse as spring progresses to summer. Winter is the best season for a clear atmosphere, and it shall be missed by myself. Photographs are affected greatly by this mirage-like effect, and sharpness and resolution is reduced. Long lenses suffer more because they amplify the effect. There is little that can be done in this case, except shoot earlier in the morning or later in the day when the atmosphere is more stable. Also, it can help to be above your subject (such as, on a mountain). Anyway, I was having such a great day that I really didn’t care that much! Enjoy the moment, if the photographs come, they come – if they don’t then there is always next time!

As always, a short detour to the south prison cliffs was the next item on the agenda. I swore that I was not going to do this on this day, and instead do something else – but I lied to myself. I love it here. A quick stop for a shot and a small bite to eat (Lion bar, yum), then I planned to sit above the Great Gully of the south prison itself (also known as McAlpines Back Passage). Cloghernagh copy.jpg

Descending sharply here to reach my resting spot above the Great Gully. Lunchtime!Selfie_1 copy.jpg

I didn’t enjoy my sandwich much this day to be honest. I opted for chicken tikka, lettuce and sweetcorn. But, it sort of dawned on me here as I was chomping away that perhaps I’d have been better off with just plain chicken and that I did not enjoy tikka sandwich as much as I thought I would. However, I had some amazing raspberries for dessert. They were incredible!

Another shot at the head of the Great Gully, this time minus me.Great Gully copy.jpg

I shot this image and the ‘selfie’ type image above it with my Sigma 20mm f/1.4 Art lens. A wonderful wide angle lens, but not perfect. The lens can suffer from sharpness reducing lateral chromatic aberration (AKA transverse CA) in the edges of the image frame due to an inverted ‘V’ (think of ‘^’) shaped field curvature that favours the foreground so that peripheries in the background can become less sharp if not focussed appropriately (hence the use of manual focus!). Software (such as Lightroom, Raw Therapee) can help this effect to some degree, and the colour fringing but there is a small loss of sharpness as a result (but software cannot fix out of focus areas). So careful focus placement is required. Tripod a necessity. But I am looking at the image at pixel level size – even a very, very large print would not reveal this problem! Like I said, I am picky! But like I also said, nothing is perfect and as far as wide angle lenses go, this one is extraordinary.

From here, looking to the south (and shooting with the Milvus 100mm f/2), we can see (beyond the peat hags of Lybagh and Slievemaan mountains) the richly cultivated farmlands of South Wicklow, Carlow & Wexford and a hazy, though prominent Mount Leinster and his cohort of jumbled hills that form the Blackstairs Mountains range.Mount Leinster copy.jpg

I was remarking to myself how quiet Lugnaquilla was on such a wonderful Saturday. It is a popular mountain to climb so this was a great surprise to me. But then as I detoured nearby the summit over towards the north prison, a glimpse of the summit cairn told me that the party was there, and I had not been invited! I thought the party was over at the gully! In all seriousness though, it’s amazing how many people climb this mountain, head straight for the summit then head back the same way. As I’ve often said, there is so much more to explore on the mountain – in the gullies, the prisons and on the quieter slopes. I enjoy the quieter areas personally, never really been one for crowds, or parties for that matter.Summit Party copy.jpg

Another long range (ish) shot as I made my way across the summit from the south prison to the north prison. This shot showing the beautiful (and heavily forested) townland of Aughavannagh with Croghan Kinsella rearing above in the distance. Aughavannagh has been described in books I have read as ‘the last place God made’ – because it is so remote. Saving the best for last? Well, I am not sure it’s the best place on Earth, but the views up to Lugnaquilla and its imposing south prison from there are truly beautiful.Aughavannagh and Croghan Kinsella copy.jpg

Just above the north prison corrie rim now, and I took a quick glance (and photograph) northwards over the Wicklow Mountain range. An assorted jumble of lumps and bumps:Wicklow Mountain Range copy.jpg

The above was taken with the Milvus 100mm f/2, the loaner lens. Proving itself to be sharp edge to edge for distance work as well as a brilliant performance for close range work – an exemplary performance and what I was expecting from the Milvus 135mm (and also the Samyang 135mm, and all prime lenses for that matter). After evaluating the images from this walk and other test samples I shot and carefully examined, I decided that this lens was definitely a ‘keeper’. A truly wonderful little lens. The great guys over at Conns Cameras sorted me out and I did a simple exchange (and a small refund for me, this was slightly cheaper than the Zeiss 135mm I had originally bought from them) and I am keeping this lens. Brilliant customer service, and that’s one of the reasons I shop with them, not to mention the fact that they were willing to lend me the (very expensive) lens on a loan basis whilst my brand new 135mm (2 weeks old) lens went in for servicing. A bitter pill to swallow indeed after spending a large amount of money on it.

Whilst the 100mm is not exactly the focal length I wanted (it is 35mm shorter), the performance is so good, I simply could not bear to part with it. There are also no guarantees that a lens sent in for ‘servicing’ will come back better than when it went in. I’ve said it before, I do not like to gamble.

Anyway, enough of my techy/nerdy ramblings – here is the north prison.The North Prison copy.jpg

More sun light illuminating the tumbling cliffs than the last time I was here, the sun’s transit through the sky has been revised and the seasons are indeed changing. What an amazing day.

Me again! Boy! Do I need a haircut! Resting above the north prison, contemplating the view and the return journey to my car. Time, as always, was pressing on at this point.Me & The North Prison copy.jpg

Hard to tear myself from the view I had here. I took a shot of it (below) but in my experience great views do not translate to great photographs a lot of the time. Looking down to the Sugar Loaf of West Wicklow, Glen Imaal and the artillery/anti tank range and the forested area of Stranahely. There is a tremendous view over to Lugnaquilla and the north prison to be had from a gentle stroll around the Stranahely forest tracks (in a freshly felled area of the plantations). One of the things I love about shooting with sharp lenses and a high resolution camera is the ability to zoom right in on an image and view details with high clarity that I (or anybody else, for that matter) could not have possibly seen with the eyes.Sugar Loaf copy.jpg

Descending my favourite slope now, views beyond the navigation aid cairn (for the track to Slievemaan) reveal a weather beaten labyrinth of peat hags on Lybagh/Slievemaan.Slievemaan Navigation Cairn copy.jpg

Contrasty light. Most landscapes are better during the ‘golden hours’ around sunrise and sunset but I do like to shoot landscapes at all times of the day. It’s representative of what people who might visit the area would likely see, so I suppose it’s more true to the scene.

Back at Camara Hill now, fittingly I took a shot showing the same view I had near the start of this day’s journey over to Lugnaquilla itself. Much more pleasing late afternoon light at this stage.Lug copy.jpg

There is a memorial statue at the side of Fenton’s Pub of Micheal Dwyer, near where my car was parked. Being an Englishman myself, the history of this area is fascinating to me regarding the 1798 rebellion against the English. There is an excellent OPW (Office of Public Works) museum on the slopes of Keadeen mountain with a fascinating history of Dwyer himself (The Dwyer McAllister Cottage). I won’t tell the story here, but I most definitely recommend a visit and I class it as one of Wicklow’s many hidden gems.Dwyer copy.jpg

Back at my car now, and what a great day. The sunset looked promising but I was just simply too tired this day! So here is one I caught one night after work the week before with the Milvus 100mm.Sunset copy.jpg

I actually visited Lugnaquilla again on the sunday just gone (2nd April). Another wonderful day and I found a great new route down besides the cliffs of the north prison (after checking in with the Army Warden Office of course). I might write a blog about that trip soon but for now the hamstring pain is too fresh! It’s too soon! I have to learn to walk a little less on the weekends and a little more in the week – try to balance it. I’ve become a bit of a ‘weekend warrior’ whereby in the week I am quite docile (I have a desk job as a software engineer) but on the weekend I end up doing about 20km or so. This causes pain!

After discovering the #VantagePoint project by Light.co, I wanted to join in on the conversation and share my favorite locations to shoot. And Lugnaquilla is most certainly one of my absolute favourite locations to shoot. It’s a challenging location and because I carry so much heavy gear, perhaps a smaller, more compact set-up might be beneficial for me! Something to think about!

Thank you for reading!

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The images presented here are my intellectual property and must not be distributed without my consent.