A Green Lugnaquilla

Well, I did a blog post about a White Lugnaquilla in winter, and now that it is summer and the ‘Emerald Isle’ is particularly green at the moment, I thought I’d do a post about a green Lugnaquilla!
This would be my ninth visit to this wonderful place in the last 9 months. I had visited four times prior to that, but I had to skip it for a year whilst my injuries healed and I built up my strength/fitness. I’d like to try to continue my monthly visits, so injuries – stay away!
The usual drill, early start (before 3am), park at Fentons (who were locking up as I was also locking up my car, coincidentally) and then off I go, up Camara Hill and onwards to the highest point in the east of Ireland.

Readers of my blog will know that I prefer the winter months for photography. I like the snow and the ice, and the subdued hues of winter. The light can be better too, with the sun lower in the sky. I less prefer the vibrancy of spring/summer. But every season has its positives. In summer, the days are long and on a fine day, the colours are very, well colourful!

New things this day. I have never hiked to Lugnaquilla when the forecast was for 27°C! So, that was new. Also, my old 66 litre rucksack was damaged (I had used it for years) so that needed replacing, and I also treated myself to new hiking poles! I do spoil myself…. You can see me showing off my new pack in the cover image above. You will need a monitor at least 1920 pixels wide, mind. My photographs are intended to be viewed on larger screens (not tablets or phones). Here is a smaller version, hopefully it might be more ‘phone friendly’. I am overlooking the north prison here, and I checked with the Army Warden Service (near Fenton’s Pub) if I was clear to go here, and permission was given. Always check with the warden when doing this walk, the artillery range is extremely dangerous and has unexploded ordnance.
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Some may wonder why I revisit this place again and again. It’s different each time, and there are many things to see here. The light is always different, the atmosphere always different. I try not to replicate photographs that I have previously taken (unless I am comparing the seasons), and this creates a challenge that I enjoy. It helps creativity and pushes me to explore just that bit further.

Near the start of the day, just as I had arrived at the first summit of Camara Hill. The sun had just started to rise.Deer copy.jpg

Many deer this morning! Even at this low resolution, you should be able to see them in the foreground.
Deer Lug copy.jpg

My plan for this day was to skirt the north prison cliffs on my ascent, head to the summit and then enter the very head of the north prison itself. I then wanted to head over to the great gully of the south prison and finally make my return journey via the ascent route near the north prison cliffs. I cannot stress enough the importance of communicating your plans with the Glen Imaal Defence Forces Information Centre. There is a phone number on the Mountaineering Ireland website that you can call for information, or you can do what I prefer to do and that is – pop in and show them your plans on a map. I’d like to add that I cleared my plans for this day with the warden in the office. If you plan to do a similar (or a slight deviation of this) route then you must check in with the warden. I am not responsible if you do this route, then end up straying into the impact zone – that is your responsibility. All I can do is advise you that you must check in with the warden!

6.21 am, and I am nearing the final push up to Lug itself alongside the north prison rim. The sun is quite high already, it rose over an hour ago at this stage. The angle will soon be perfect for the shot I had in mind for the north prison. I had better bust-a-move on!
Sun copy.jpg

Beside the great cliffs of the north prison now, and in my peripheral vision I sense movement on the cliffs. A hare! I have never seen this before!
Super fast reflexes on my part to manually focus my (manual focus only) Zeiss 100mm lens and I managed to get a shot. Wow, a rare sight. It looked as if s/he was enjoying the view as much as I was!Hare copy.jpg

From here, the view down the glen to the Sugar Loaf of West Wicklow is green, green, green!
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A very clear atmosphere this morning, I can pick out tiny details on the rocks of the glen floor, several kilometers away. Quite rare, especially at this time of year (winter often provides a less turbulent and clearer atmosphere).

More animals, this time – sheep – on the summit plateau – also known as “Percy’s Table”. Sheep copy.jpg

The view slightly west of north from where I leave the summit area to descend into the north prison (I only descended a small bit into the prison itself). Many of Wicklow’s summits can be seen from here. Tonelagee, Turlough Hill and Djouce are particularly prominent.
Wicklow Mountains copy.jpg

Found my spot in the prison, time for a sarnie I think. Ham & lettuce (my usual), followed by some grapes. Good snack!
This is the spot where I took the cover image, and below are a couple more shots (minus me) of the area. Expansive view here!
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Look at that clear sky!
One might wish for clouds, for a bit of drama – but, Gah! Who cares. Sometimes it’s nice to be out in nice weather! It is quite rare to get such a nice day on a weekend day in Ireland. Especially at Lugnaquilla.
North Prison II copy.jpg

Tough work though, such a hot day and I carry so much gear. But great fun.
Heading back up now, and the next plan for the day is actioned. Hop on over to the great gully of the south prison.
But I took a short detour towards Cloghernagh mountain before this, I always enjoy the view back over to Lug from here.
Hanging off the cliffs near Lugcoolmeen here, a wide view of the south prison is revealed. To get a shot like this with a wide angle lens, you need to be at the precipice, proper. I got some funny looks when coming back up from here, let me tell you haha!
South Prison copy.jpg

A long range view now, looking down beyond the forested slopes of Corrigasleggaun, and over to Croghan Kinsella. Crogan Kinsella copy.jpg

Next location – the great gully (also known as “McAlpine’s Back Passage” of the south prison. Autobots, roll out!
I always pause and take this shot, it’s one of my personal favourite views up here. Looking over to Cloghernagh (at left) and Corrigasleggaun (right). I wish my wordpress account allowed higher resolution photographs to be uploaded, but I believe you have to pay for that facility. But at the higher resolution version I have of this, the detail is outstanding. You can pick out every rock very clearly, and zoom right in for crazy details.
Cloghernagh and Corrigasleggaun copy.jpg

A close up of one of the jagged rocks near the summit area.Jagged copy.jpg

At my spot now, peering down the great gully.
It’s possible to climb up here, very steep terrain though and not something you ought to be doing as a solo hiker (as I am).
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A wider shot of the gully, with the surrounding mountains to the east on show.
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I sat here for a while, contemplating the views and drinking my third litre of water! I had brought 5 litres this day. And drank it all! It was super hot.
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After a while, I decided to head back towards the north prison, and begin my descent.
I had been on the mountains for six hours at this stage.
Passing the familiar ‘dice’ of Lugnaquilla, I paused for a shot. I always shoot this rocky outcrop!
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Descending now, and the view down to Glen of Imaal and the surrounding area is amazing from here. As the day is pressing on, the colours are coming alive a bit more.
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Look! Another animal! Bertie the beetle :-D. Enjoying a snack I see. Eating Lugnaquilla! hold up mate, don’t eat it all – I plan to come back here!
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My last photograph of the day – over 12 hours from the start of my day I might add! Yes, I was tired and hot and at this point I was CRAVING an ice cream. I must have needed the sugar and electrolytes. You have no idea how grateful I was when I stopped at the Glen Imaal store (I think there is only one shop in the glen) and they had my favourite – Cornetto King Cone! Words cannot express how heavenly it was. I think that hiking over 27 km’s in 20°C+ temperatures earns it!
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Please do remember what I said about checking in with the Army Warden when planning to approach (or walk in the vicinity of) Lugnaquilla or in the Glen of Imaal.

Thank you for reading!

If you like what you see here please feel free to take a look at my portfolio site where you can see lots more of my work, or follow me on Twitter or Facebook here!

The images presented here are my intellectual property and must not be distributed without my consent.

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A Frosty Log Na Coille

Another hike to Lug, yes! Another early start (5am), another late finish (6pm). I was on the mountains for roughly 11 hours this day (deducting car time). Nowhere else in Wicklow that I’d rather be though. This would be my second visit to the Monarch of Wicklow in the month of January 2017. Well, I might as well start as I mean to go on.
The weather at Lugnaquilla (Log Na Coille) is always going to be hit and miss. It’s in complete fog 3 days out of 5. Often it’s very windy and raining. In autumn/winter/early spring it is regularly covered in ice and snow. I was really hoping for a decent amount of snow, having not been out on the mountains all week previously (at least, not in the daylight – see this night shot of Glendalough I took on friday night), I did not know if the high ground had snow or not.
But with Lug, you can check all the forecasts in the world, but on the day you go, all bets are pretty much off. The forecasts might give you a rough idea. But that is all they can do. Sensible advice is to prepare for the worst weather and then not be ‘caught out’ if it occurs.
According to my sources, it was due to be foggy in the morning, and clear in the afternoon. So I was expecting to hike up in the dark to Camara Hill and see a fog covered Lugnaquilla.
This was not so:Log Na Coille Clear copy.jpg

Being what it is, a pleasant enough (calm) sunrise – this was not the most exciting one this photographer has witnessed. Perhaps sunset will reveal something more interesting- let’s find out!

Anyway, a long way to go yet. My iPod pedometer clocked up 21.4 kilometers before the battery died! I estimate I covered about 25km this day. Not too shabby, considering only a year ago I could not stand up without agony! Time is a good healer, but in my case, lots of physiotherapy might be an even better one!

Anyway, a cold day. But light winds meant that wind chill was not an issue. A frozen infant (near the source) ‘Little Slaney’ river on approach to the final slope of Lug.Little Slaney copy.jpg

Conditions, as you can see, were cold, overcast with high altitude clouds dominating the sky and light southerly winds. But not at all unpleasant. I did not take many photographs until I reached the summit area. Nice and frosty up there.Frosty Summit copy.jpg

Dropping down a little from the summit to the south prison cliffs, a wonderful view was in store.Log Na Coille copy.jpg

The quality of light was interesting. There was a thin mist (as opposed to fog) in the atmosphere which hampered long range views but muted the colours of the mountains in a pleasing way – at least to my eye.
The beautiful, tumbling cliffs of the south prison of Lugnaquilla.Cliffs of the south prison copy.jpg

An interesting story about these cliffs, I once witnessed a large fox frantically charging down nearby these cliffs to the valley below. I wondered what the fox was doing in this depopulated and exposed area. Surely there are better food scraps to be had in the populated valleys? Amazing to watch, and I was envious of the creatures agility!

Frosty!Frosty copy.jpg

One might question why I visit this place so often when I could jump on a plane and visit some of the grander mountains of the world. Well, I live only an hour or so drive from here for one thing. But really, I think from a photographic standpoint, it is quite a challenging subject. The shape of the mountain is not your typical dramatic peak. Some might argue that it lacks the excitement of the more ‘established’ photogenic mountains such as Kirkjufell, or the Matterhorn, for example. I suppose that Lug might lack an ‘instant gratification’ factor (that is so overwhelmingly prevalent in modern society) to some degree. Some mountains allow ‘easy wins’ photographically speaking because they are dramatic, or because they are naturally photogenic. I think Lugnaquilla has a certain quietness about it, a certain humble charm that doesn’t scream ‘photograph me, I am here and look how exciting I am’. Instead, I think it whispers ‘explore me if you wish, I have lots to offer’. Another thing to consider is that photographs of the more ‘traditionally beautiful’ mountains are literally ten a penny. I think there is merit in trying to create and do something different. Anyway, that is my logic I suppose.

The summit of Lugnaquilla is broad and flat, and to get really good views you do have to make some effort to identify the best places to stand. I am still working on that :-), but getting there I think!

A slightly different view of the south prison.
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Anyway, lots to see here: so I scooted off over to the north prison for a spot of lunch. I actually forgot (again) to eat my lunch at this point. I keep doing that, I get too engrossed in the views and the camera, and taking it all in. Not a good idea. I did have some yummy strawberries here though after I realised my error (and had packed my stuff away in my rucksack and decided to head elsewhere). At this point, I was actually grateful for the overcast skies because the shadows of the north prison rim here would have been too dark if the sun was out. In the distance at right we can see Glen Imaal with the Sugarloaf of West Wicklow rearing its pointy head above the forestry. Looks small from here!
North Prison copy.jpg

I identified, though did not shoot from, the optimal viewpoint of the north prison this day. I did not go there because I always have to be mindful of the distances I cover (due to leg/foot problems), but I know where it is for next time. I shall of course return, there is much work to be done here.
I was compelled however, to revisit the south prison as I saw some interesting sun beams breaking through the clouds in that direction.Sun beams copy.jpg

Worth the effort I thought. I also took a few more photographs of the view from the top of the south prison itself. Yes, a murky day, but a good one nevertheless. A view I always enjoy:From the south prison copy.jpg

I started to make my return journey at this stage, so I took a last glance over to the north prison (it’s almost on the way back anyway, plus it’s a tradition of mine now). It looks like some fog is potentially rolling in from the south now, visibility is getting poorer and the cliffs are getting hazier. It rolled in for several minutes, then started to lift as I was heading back down. Only to return again a small bit later.Fog copy.jpg

Boba Fett takes aim. You are no good to me, fog! You will be disintegrated!Boba takes aim copy.jpg

Star Wars nerdiness aside, heading back to the car now. Looking back over to Lug, a view I am very familiar with appears – and I can see that the clouds are again descending upon Lugnaquilla.Lug copy.jpg

Look! The sun came out! Lug Fog copy.jpg

Back at the first summit of Camara Hill now. A torturous (for me at least) descent awaits. I was carrying three heavy lenses (1kg each), the camera(1kg), the tripod (about 4kg), a whole bunch of clothing layers and lots of water on this trip (I took 3 litres, I have high water needs!). My bag total probably weighed about 15-20kg. That hurts man. But thank god for trekking poles. Anyway, the warning sign here states: “If a warning flag or lantern is displayed at this location, this indicates that the range is live, and that you are in danger.”.  No flag or lantern. Phew! Seriously though, you must always check that there is no firing in the artillery range before taking this route. Yep, the cloud is really clinging to Lugnaquilla now.Sign copy.jpg

Pausing for a rest on the descent now, taking the pressure off tired knees and feet. The colour of the sky is beautiful above the shoulders of Keadeen mountain and Spinans Hill.Spinans copy.jpg

I always enjoy this tree on the slopes of Camara Hill, particularly so in winter. Worth a rest break!Tree copy.jpg

Another sunrise to sunset hike at Lugnaquilla, another forgotten lunch! I did eat it eventually, just a bit too late! Foot bath time, I think. Now, where are my Epsom salts?

One last long exposure photograph (the sun had long gone down at this stage) looking over to Lugnaquilla as the fog rolls over it, tucking it into bed for the night!Lugnaquilla copy.jpg

Thank you for reading!

If you like what you see here please feel free to take a look at my portfolio site where you can see lots more of my work, or follow me on Facebook here!

The images presented here are my intellectual property and must not be distributed without my consent.